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Outdoor Report 9/12

Salmon fishing from the Pacific Ocean to the Columbia River above the Bonneville Dam has been exceptionally good. There has been consistent reports of Coho caught up river all the way to the ocean. Those chasing Chinook has also been finding success above Bonneville Dam. Salmon are everywhere! Salmon fishing from the Pacific Ocean to the Columbia River above the Bonneville Dam has been exceptionally good. There has been consistent reports of Coho caught up river all the way to the ocean. Those chasing Chinook has also been finding success above Bonneville Dam. Salmon are everywhere!

The Coho fishing in the lower Columbia has been good, especially those fishing down in the Astoria/ Buoy 10 area. These fish have really flooded the river on the last set of large tides and are heading up river in force. In the estuary, this fish can be caught on just about anything. Most fishermen troll with flashers and bait or spinners when in Astoria. However, once the fish hit the warm water of the Columbia and get above Tongue Point, they tend to stray away from the bait bite and key in on spinners and even plugs. Folks can troll spinners and lead or smaller spinners behind 360 flashers. Try focusing your efforts a little bit suspended in the water column and around cold-water inlets such as the mouth of the Cowlitz, Lewis and Sandy. If you happen to find fish piled up at the mouths of one of these areas and are having trouble getting them to bite try some twitching jigs, sometimes it can be the missing ingredient and will get the bite going.

Chinook fishing above Bonneville Dam is still a viable option. Again, focusing on cold water inlets will be your best bet. These fish tend to school up, so fishing eggs and Sand Shrimp is a great technique. For those that are really wanting to troll, 360o Flashers and Super Baits or small spinners will also work well.

Coho fishing has already started on local tributaries with some new fish showing up on every new tide. These early fish can be super aggressive and want to chase spinners, plugs, spoons and bait. Target faster moving water to get after these aggressive fish.

Tillamook Bay has had a few fish move in the bay recently. Typically this fishery doesn’t get rocking until the end of September, although with all the rain we are having there could easily be a good shot of fish any day. Trolling triangle flashers and Herring has been a go-to technique in Tillamook and Nehalem Bay. However, over the last few years the 360o Flasher craze has really started to take hold in these fisheries. Small spinners or smaller Brad’s Kokanee Cut-Plugs have worked very well the last few years.

Bottom fishing has been killer with lots of big rockfish being caught. Folks are taking advantage of how good the fishing is by heading out and catching their bottom fish limit quickly and then trolling for Salmon the rest of the day and usually catching that limit also. Vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs have been the go-to.

Tuna fishing has remained stellar. Fishermen have been catching fish up and down the coast with boats catching fish on a multitude of techniques. Many have been trolling, vertical jigging, casting swimbaits, fishing live bait and even trolling large X-rap plugs.

Trout fishing around the local area has been picking up, especially with the evening starting to cool down a little bit. The Trout can sense the onset of fall and are going to start trying to pack on the weight for a long winter. ODFW will continue to stock Trout throughout the fall. Typically, these plants will have some of the nicer Trophy Trout mixed in, which can make for an exciting time at the lake not knowing what you might hook. Trolling small plugs, spinners, wedding rings and even flies are all great options when chasing these fun fish. Casting spinners along the shoreline also works well.

In Tillamook Bay, Nehalem Bay and in Astoria the crabbing has been great. The crab is starting to get bigger with quality crab being caught recently. Always remember to weigh down your pots to insure they don’t get swept out to the ocean on some of the larger upcoming tides.

 

Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

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