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  • Outdoor Report 6/14

    Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Dave Maroon, shows off a huge Walleye caught and released on the Columbia river. The Columbia is still quite high, but those that are willing to put the time in can definitely be rewarded. Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Dave Maroon, shows off a huge Walleye caught and released on the Columbia river. The Columbia is still quite high, but those that are willing to put the time in can definitely be rewarded.

    This past week Chinook Fishing came to a close on the Columbia from Bonneville dam to Astoria. Many anglers found great success up and down the river. Most anglers targeting Chinook exclusively were anchored up in water depths from 8’-25’ of water and were mainly using salmon size plugs. Kwikfish®, Killerfish®, Mag Lips® and Flatfish® are just a few of the popular plugs that will be used when targeting summer/spring Chinook. Be sure to wrap your plug with either sardine, herring, anchovy or prawn. Keeping a good scent trail can be vital to your success this time of year. The Columbia will re-open on the 22nd of June and a lot of folks expect the fishing to be quite good, especially with the Chinook getting a break from the angling pressure for a few days. While the Chinook fishing will be closed, the summer steelhead fishery is going and will remain open for retention. Those that are chasing steelhead are typically in a bit shallower water, ranging from 6’-15’ of water. These summer steelhead tend to hug the shoreline so you will see most fishermen pressed against the bank. Small coon stripe shrimp, small spinners or small steelhead size plugs will round out the average steelhead fisherman’s tackle box. Also bringing along a couple of different scent options will be a good idea as sometimes the fish will key in on one scent over another.

    Shad fishing remains excellent on the Columbia and on the Willamette. These hard fighting fish are great fun and provide a great opportunity for the whole family to get in on the action. Once you find the line the fish are running in, the action will typically be non- stop. Small bright colored jig heads, small spoons such as Dick Nites® or Baby Simons® or even flicker spinners are great terminal tackle options.

    Kokanee fishing locally has continued to be good with fish all up and down the water column. Small Wedding Rings®, Brads Kokanee Cut-Plugs® and Wiggle Woochies™ are great options when choosing terminal tackle. Put any of these behind a dodger of your choosing and you will be in the game. Make sure to tip your offering with one or two kernels of shoepeg corn and the Kokanee will have a hard time leaving you alone.

    Trout fishing continues to be good as the high mountain lakes are becoming accessible and the trout are hungry! These fish haven’t seen any lures or bait since last fall so they are typically very aggressive. Trolling is a great option with small Mag Lips®, Flatfish® or Blue Fox® spinners all working well. For those that are bank bound, casting Rooster Tails®, Kastmasters® or bobber and bait will all provide great action especially in the lakes that haven’t had much pressure yet.

    Walleye fishing up in the gorge has been great. Most anglers are finding their success trolling worm harnesses and bottom walkers, others that prefer to jig are also catching fish. Make sure to rig your worm harness with bright colored beads or Corkies® as the Columbia is still a little off color so adding some color will help the walleye find your offering.

    Bottom fishing has been great, when the ocean allows people to get out and fish for them. Shrimp flies, vertical jigs and lead head jigs with a large curly tail grub are among the many options of rigs to choose from when chasing bottom fish. Once you find a few biters try to stay on top of them as the action can typically be fast and furious.

    Sturgeon fishing has closed for retention, however for those that are wanting to go catch a bunch of hard fighting fish, the catch and release fishery offers amazing opportunity. Sand shrimp, herring and anchovies are the three most popular baits choices.

    This weekend has some minus tides that should be good for clamming. Oregon’s beaches, above the mouth of the Yachats River, are still open for Razor Clams. Northern beaches like Clatsop Spit would be a great bet for digging them this weekend. Bay Clams are also available and you can have a great combo trip in some bays, collecting clams at low tides and crabbing through the flood tides. Find out the regulations, how and where to clam at https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/crabbing-clamming-report/marine-zone

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jun 15, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 6/7

    Customer Denise Griffin entered this 30-pound Columbia Chinook into the Fisherman’s/P Line Spring Chinook Derby earlier this week. With salmon fishing extended on the lower Columbia through June 15th and expanded to a two-fish limit, we should see some more monsters like this in the coming days! Our derby also runs through June 15th, so if you catch a whopper be sure to come hang it on a scale at one of our stores. Fish on! Customer Denise Griffin entered this 30-pound Columbia Chinook into the Fisherman’s/P Line Spring Chinook Derby earlier this week. With salmon fishing extended on the lower Columbia through June 15th and expanded to a two-fish limit, we should see some more monsters like this in the coming days! Our derby also runs through June 15th, so if you catch a whopper be sure to come hang it on a scale at one of our stores. Fish on!

    Salmon fishing on the Columbia remains decent despite the high water conditions and some very large chinook have been caught recently.  For the bank anglers, fishing Spin-n-Glos® with either prawns or coon shrimp have been the most productive baits.  One advantage the bank anglers have is the ability to run three different setups on the same rod.  This allows people to really dial in what color Spin-n-Glo® or prawn color the fish are after.  For the boat angler, a good technique is to anchor up and run plugs or spinners.  When picking an anchor spot, start by looking for current breaks or structures that will give the fish a break from the current. Use every advantage you have, make sure your plugs are freshly washed and that you put a good fresh bait wrap on them.

    Summer steelhead are in the mix as well on the Columbia right now, for the folks that will be plunking, use Spin-n-Glos® with prawns or coon shrimp.  For the boat angler, spinners or plugs will work well, however dropping down to a K11 Kwikfish® or 3.5 Mag Lip® will be a good idea.

    Shad are here and the bite has been nothing short of amazing.  Folks on the Willamette in the Oregon City area have been stocking their coolers with shad for the last few weeks.  The same goes for the anglers on the Columbia.  Small bright colored jig heads, small bright colored grubs, Dick Nites®, baby Simons and flicker spinners have all been producing for the shad angler.  Sometimes shad will get finicky but usually just a color change-up will get you right back in the action.

    Smallmouth bass fishing has still been going strong these last few weeks.  Fish are mostly done spawning and have spread out on their normal feeding patterns.  Shallow diving crankbaits, tubes, Senkos, lipless crankbaits and spinnerbaits are all great options when targeting these aggressive fish.

    Trout fishing has been great locally with the early morning and late evening being the most productive times.  Of course, the usual PowerBait® or night crawlers fished on the bottom will always produce some fish.  However, if you are willing to wake up early and do a little trolling or casting along the shorelines you may be rewarded with some of the bigger hold over trout that outsmarted last year’s anglers. Timothy and Clear Lake on Mt. Hood have been fishing well, and Henry Hagg Lake has also been productive.

    Sturgeon fishing has really started to heat up in the estuary.  With more and more keeper size fish being caught everyday.  Sand shrimp, herring and anchovies have all been great bait options. Saturday, June 9 is a one-day white sturgeon retention season it ends at 2 p.m. on that day. The open area is the mainstem Columbia River from Wauna powerlines downstream to the river mouth at Buoy 10, including Youngs Bay and all adjacent Washington tributaries.

    June 9-10 is a free fishing weekend in Washington. During those two days, no license will be required to fish or gather shellfish in any waters open to fishing in Washington. In addition, no vehicle access pass or Discover Pass will be required to park that weekend at any of the 700 water-access sites maintained by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).For more information, check the department’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/free/.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jun 08, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 5/31

    Customer Seth Fisher with a nice Santiam River summer steelhead. Summer fish are currently being caught in the Clackamas, Sandy, Santiams, McKenzie and a bunch of southwest Washington Rivers. Catches of summer steelhead are also picking up on the lower Columbia. Come see us for a wide variety of gear that's killer for summer steelhead and get your fish on! Customer Seth Fisher with a nice Santiam River summer steelhead. Summer fish are currently being caught in the Clackamas, Sandy, Santiams, McKenzie and a bunch of southwest Washington Rivers. Catches of summer steelhead are also picking up on the lower Columbia. Come see us for a wide variety of gear that's killer for summer steelhead and get your fish on!

    The Columbia opening back up has taken some pressure off the Willamette where the Spring Chinook fishing has been consistent this past week especially in the lower river and Multnomah Channel.  Majority of fishermen have been trolling, targeting fish suspended in the water column.  Spinners, herring, prawn spinnersSuperbaits® have all been taking fish.

    The Columbia is still very high and some might say that makes it easier to find fish.  With so much flow the fish tend to travel tight to the shorelines looking for the path of least resistance.  Finding a choke point, somewhere that the fish can take a rest from the pounding current, will be your best option.  Anchoring with Kwikfish®, Maglips®, Flatfish® or Killerfish® are great options.  These large profile plugs create a lot of disturbance and noise underwater, giving the fish something to seek out.  Wrap them with your favorite baitfish for a winning combination.  Spinners and prawn spinners are also great choices when anchoring for Chinook, early returning summer steelhead are also attracted giving you another chance at a fish on.  The plunking crowd does amazingly well this time of year as they have narrowed down the travel lanes and can get multiple baits precisely where they need to.  Although spin-n-glo’s and prawns or coon shrimp are a favorite for most anglers, don’t be afraid to mix it up with a small orange flat fish or spinner.

    Trout fishing in local lakes has been productive with the most of lakes already receiving their first rounds of planter trout.  These fish are usually the most active first thing in the morning and last thing before dark.  Trolling wedding rings and night crawlers, small plugs, or even flies are all great options for these active fish.  As the day progresses a lot of these fish will hunker down and get close to the bottom.  Fishing Powerbait, worms, gulp products and salmon eggs are all great options to plunk off the bottom.

    Bass fishing has been great on the Willamette and Columbia.  These fish are extremely aggressive and willing to bite.  Fishing soft plastics, lipless or shallow diving crankbaits and even top water baits are all great options when targeting these shallow water bass.  Search the shorelines until you find biting fish and stay on them.  Switching up techniques will keep you on biting fish.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading outFind reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jun 01, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 5/24

    Fisherman's Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, with a dandy Deschutes Redside that struck a dry fly. The famous salmonfly hatch is peaking right now on the Deschutes, and fishing has been phenomenal! Fisherman's Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, with a dandy Deschutes Redside that struck a dry fly. The famous salmonfly hatch is peaking right now on the Deschutes, and fishing has been phenomenal!

    The Columbia is still quite high and this has caused the Willamette to lose a lot of its current turning most of the river into a trolling fishery and yet spring chinook fishing has remained consistent this week. Some anglers are trolling with 360° Flashers while others are using triangle flashers or trolling herring, anchovies or prawns, and then there are those that have switched exclusively to spinners, Super Baits and multiple sizes of Brad’s® Cut Plugs.  Basically, it’s a dealer’s choice as to what you want to troll.  Not one specific lure or technique has been out fishing another.

    Both Drano Lake and the Wind River fishery are still producing spring chinook.  These fisheries may continue to fish well for a few weeks as the Columbia is so high that the springers have started to slow down a little going over Bonneville Dam dragging out the run timing a little bit.  These fisheries are very diverse in what techniques are used.  You will see everything from bobber fishing and casting plugs to trolling prawn spinners with 360° Flashers and flatlining plugs.

    The Columbia is reopening this Friday the 25th for chinook retention and there are plenty of people looking forward to it.  Because the Columbia is high right now I would focus on shallow water flats, these are cutoff points along the bank that will give fish a reprieve from the current.  Steelhead and salmon will both be traveling these paths so be prepared to hook either one.  Anchor fishing plugs or prawns will be your best option.  Whether Mag Lips®, Kwikfish®, Flatfish® or Killerfish, anchor fishing in one of the cutoff choke points will be the most productive way to target these high-water salmon.  Another great option is to plunk in these conditions.  Spin-N-Glos® and prawns or coon shrimp are the most popular bait choice with plugs being the second most popular choice.

    Bottom fishing has been great all up and down the coast line.  Most anglers are having no problem getting their limits of seabass and are also having great success targeting lingcod.  Vertical jigs, shrimp flies and curly tail grubs are among the many bait choices that anglers have been using to catch these delicious creatures.

    Sturgeon fishing has been a little spotty since the Columbia is so high.  Under these conditions it can be more difficult to find the groups of sturgeon, but once you do the action can be consistent.  Sand shrimp, anchovies, herring and smelt are all great baits when chasing these lower river fish. Anchovies and sand shrimp have been the most consistent producers lately.

    Trout fishing is a great way to get the family out on the water, especially on a holiday weekend.  Take some PowerBait® and nightcrawlers and fish them off the bottom. This can be an excellent way to spend a couple of hours on a local lake.  Also casting spinners along shorelines, especially early or late in the day, can be another fun way to target trout.

    Shad fishing has been going for a few days now and will only get better over the next few weeks.  These hard fighting fish are also perfect to take the family out fishing for. They are great biters and there is usually no shortage of them.  Small bright colored jig head, micro grubs and small wobblers are all perfect options when chasing shad.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    May 25, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 5/17

    Jon Stagniti with an awesome sturgeon he caught earlier this week from the Columbia River Estuary fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Staffer, Chris Vertopoulos. While sturgeon fishing has been challenging near Astoria, Jon’s fish shows that there are some quality keeper fish around! Jon Stagniti with an awesome sturgeon he caught earlier this week from the Columbia River Estuary fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Staffer, Chris Vertopoulos. While sturgeon fishing has been challenging near Astoria, Jon’s fish shows that there are some quality keeper fish around!

    With the Columbia being high and backing up the flow on the Willamette, many anglers have moved back into the harbor area where Spring Chinook fishing has been holding steady.  Having no current pushing them, the fish will sit low in the harbor, suspended, and take their time.  There has been a mix of trolling triangle or 360° flashers.  Small 3.5 spinners, Brad’s Superbaits® and Cut Plugs are the most popular to troll behind the 360° flashers, while anglers fishing triangle flashers have been using herring, anchovies, spinners of various size, prawn spinners and Superbaits®.  Currently it is a matter of preference, however, as the water warms up 360° flashers will become the preferred method.

    Fishing at Drano Lake and the mouth of Wind River has been steady this week.  These fisheries are small and can become slightly crowded, the fish don’t have a lot of places to hide, so bringing several presentations will allow you to fine tune your presentation.  Once you dial in on what they want, fishing can be fast and furious.  Trolling flashers with some sort of bait is the most popular technique; usually herring, prawns, coon shrimp or anchovies.

    More high mountain lakes are becoming accessible providing more Trout fishing possibilities.  Spinners, small Flatfish®, Wedding Rings® or small Wiggle Hoochies® are all great baits to troll.  Plunking nightcrawlers, Powerbait®, salmon eggs or casting spinners are all great options from the shorelines.

    Bottom fishing has been great, when the weather has allowed it.  Curly tail grubs, shrimp flies or vertical jigging have all been working well.  Vertical jigging has been especially productive in getting ling cod to bite.  Along the coastline the Spring Chinook fishing is just getting started.  Tillamook Bay has seen a few good days along the jaws already but the bulk of the fish are just arriving.  Trolling herring is the most popular technique but trolling spinners in the upper Bay is a close second.  Either way bringing a couple sets of rods to try different techniques is not a bad idea when chasing coastal Springers.

    Bass fishing has been heating up in the Columbia and Willamette.  Fish are starting to move into the shallow bays and becoming increasingly more aggressive.  Grubs, senkos, shallow diving crankbaits and even topwater baits all work well in these situations.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    May 18, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 5/10

    The road into Timothy Lake is now snow-free, and there are some nice trout awaiting you! The road into Timothy Lake is now snow-free, and there are some nice trout awaiting you!

    The Willamette River continues to produce Spring Chinook in decent numbers. As the water continues to warm, many anglers are switching over to Pro Trolls and small spinners. In fact, yesterday in Oregon City, Fisherman’s Pro Guide Eric Baird limited his boat with six hatchery springers while trolling small Hildebrandt Spinners behind Pro Troll Flashers. There seem to be a lot of fish around, it’s just a matter of getting them to snap. Eric suggests to keep changing your spinner color and trolling speed until you find a combination that works on any given day.  The fish in the lower river are typically suspended in the water column so sometimes staggering your depths will help you key in on where the fish are holding.  Jigging with P-line Laser Minnows in the Oregon City Reach has been effective.

    The Wind River and Drano Lake fisheries also kicked off last week.  Some fishermen will be trolling traditional triangle flashers with herring, anchovies and prawn spinners while others will be fishing 360° flashers with the same techniques run behind them. You will see anglers flat-lining Mag Lips®, Mag Warts®, and even Kwikfish®, or fishing bobber and eggs or prawns. Anglers from the bank will be casting spinners or Wiggle Warts®. The fish at both locations are known to be aggressive so it’s typically about getting your gear in front of a biter.

    Summer steelhead are starting to enter the local tributaries. We have had reports of fish being caught on a multitude of techniques, the majority being caught on bobber and jig or diver and bait.

    At the coast we have had a few reports of Spring Chinook entering Tillamook Bay. Tillamook does not get the numbers of Chinook that the Willamette and Columbia do, however, what they lack in numbers they make up for in quality.  These fish are revered as some of the hardest fighting Spring Chinook.  Another great option when at the coast is to target rock fish and ling cod. Bottom fishing can be extremely entertaining as you don’t know what type of fish you may hook, and they are delicious!

    Surf Perch is another coastal fish that can be easily targeted from the bank. A long, medium-heavy spinning rod with a 2 to 4 ounce weight and a sand shrimp, clam necks or one of the Berkley Gulp!® products is all you need to be successful at chasing surf perch.

    Trout fishing has continued to be good.  With the warm weather we have been having the high mountain lakes are becoming more accessible as the snow continues to melt.  Right after the roads open can be one of the best times to target these trout, as they have not been fished on for months. Trolling small Flatfish®, Mag Lips® or even a Wedding Ring® and worm can be extremely productive this time of year. As always check your local stocking schedule to find out what lakes have recently been stocked.  Skyline Road is now clear all the way to Timothy Lake, and as of last Monday, the only boat ramp open here was at Pine Point near the dam.  Fishing was very good.  The road into Clear Lake is also clear and the boat ramp is accessible.

    We have had some recent reports of Smallmouth Bass fishing improving on the Willamette.  As they move shallower, they become extremely aggressive and will attack any sort of soft plastic, crankbaits or topwater bait that gets in their way.  Smallmouth bass fishing on the Columbia has been phenomenal!

    Monday May 14 is the start of a 10-day series of lower Columbia River Sturgeon retention days below the Wauna powerlines to Buoy 10. They will be every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday up to June 4th, or until the quota has been reached. Please go to ODFW’s website for specific details outlining the bag limits, slot size, and open areas.

    For those interested in Halibut please note that the Columbia River Subarea all-depth Halibut fishery will be closing at 11:59 pm on Friday, May 11, due to projected attainment of the quota.  Nearshore Halibut is open Mondays-Wednesdays until the nearshore quote is met.  The Central Coast Subarea Spring all-depth season will be open 12 fixed days on May 10-12, May 24-26, June 7-9 and June 21-23.  Nearshore Halibut begins June 1.  Please check for more details and regulations at ODFW.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    May 11, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 5/3

    A brace of plump and delicious Wickiup Kokanee is enough to draw any serious angler to the east side.  A brace of plump and delicious Wickiup Kokanee is enough
    to draw any serious angler to the east side.

    Spring Chinook have been on the move this last week with both Willamette Falls and Bonneville Dam showing significant improvement of fish passage.  We are still seeing new fish showing up in the lower Willamette every day and the Multnomah Channel has been producing fish throughout.  Most of the fish are being caught on herring, anchovies or prawns behind a flasher, but as the water warms you will start to see fish caught on spinners, Superbaits® and prawn spinners.  Keeping a few options in the boat is a must in the spring time; you never know what the fish will want.  The Portland Harbor has been producing as well, with most anglers using the same techniques.  The closer you get to Oregon City the techniques start to change to an egg or prawn show.  Many anglers will be fishing eggs, shrimp or prawns behind a jumbo diver.  These fish are starting to congregate in this section of the river and are known to be finicky at times.  Having a wide variety of scent or additives to add to your bait can make or break your day.

    As we move into May, more Shad will be caught.  These fish are such a blast to catch and provide a fantastic opportunity for younger generations to get involved in the sport.  These aggressive fish like small shad darts or jigs in bright colors.  They also like Dick Nite® spoons, baby Simon Wobblers and small flicker spinners.  Once you find the line that these fish are swimming up, the action can be fast paced!

    Bottom fishing has been very good along the coast.  Lots of boats are reporting good amounts of ling cod mixed in with the rock fish.  Curly tail jigs and shrimp flies are some of the most popular lures for rock fish and the ling cod like large swimbaits or jigs.  This is one of the fisheries that you really don’t know what you have hooked until you get it close to the boat. Don’t forget that regulations were introduced last year that require any boat fishing for rock fish to have a “descending device” on board.

    Trout fishing has really ramped up with the nicer weather.  Stillwater trout fishing is a wonderful way to get kids into fishing as you can cast out some power bait, worms or salmon eggs and fish them off the bottom while still cooking lunch, or playing games with the kids.  For those that have a boat, trolling is also a great way to target trout as kids don’t have to cast; they can just sit back and wait for the rod to get bit.

    Panfish and bass are another fishery that starts to kick off with this change in weather.  There are lots of ponds that will have bluegill, sunfish, smallmouth bass and Largemouth bass start to become very active.  Crappie jigs, soft plastics, shallow diving crankbaits and jigs are all great options for these warm water fish.

    Kokanee fishing is off to a fair start, but should only improve as lakes continue to warm. Southwest Washington’s Lake Merwin continues to put out quality fish for those trolling shallow with 100-125 feet of line out with an Arrow flash and hoochie combo. Fish have remained fairly shallow but could go deeper any time with the current warm weather pattern. Merwin’s kokanee have been averaging a plump 12-14 inches. Justin at Odell Lake reports that the water there is still very cold and kokanee fishing is in general off to a slow start, but he also said that he knows of at least two groups who brought in limits last weekend. With the current warm weather pattern, kokanee fishing at Odell could take off any day now. He also reported that a lucky angler boated a 21-pound Lake Trout there earlier today! Our Tigard Store Manager, Paul Coppinger, spent several days at Wickiup Reservoir last weekend, and reports that while fishing was definitely challenging, the quality of fish was excellent, with Wickiup kokanee averaging a healthy 17-20 inches already! They also caught some nice rainbow and brown trout to boot!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    May 04, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 4/26

    Fisherman’s employee, Gwen Dilkes with a beautiful Springer caught on the Willamette this week while fishing with Dave Eng of Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine and Dave’s Fisheng Guide Service. Fisherman’s employee, Gwen Dilkes with a beautiful Springer caught on the Willamette this week while fishing with Dave Eng of Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine and Dave’s Fisheng Guide Service.

    Spring chinook fishing has really taken off this week in the Willamette.  We have had reports of good fishing from up and down the river, as far as how you want to fish for them, it is just a matter of what your preference is.  Down in the Multnomah Channel and Portland Harbor most anglers are trolling triangle flashers with herring, anchovies or prawns.  The rest are trolling 360° Flashers with either Brad’s® Super Baits, Cut-Plugs or small 3.5 spinners.  These fish are typically suspended in the 15’-25’ range, the water is slower down there which sometimes causes them to bite your herring for a little while before burying your rod.  Try to be patient when you get a bite as it may take a little bit before the fish fully commits.  As you move up the river through Sellwood into Milwaukie, again most anglers will be trolling.  The river tends to be wide and deep so trolling is usually one of the best ways to intercept traveling fish.  Once you get up to Oak Grove and specifically the Oregon City fishery, it becomes an egg, shrimp and prawn show.  These fish tend to stack up more the closer they get to the falls, with that in mind, bringing a variety of scents can pay off when trying to key in on what these fish are after.  Small plugs work as well, such as Mag Lips®, Wiggle Warts®, K-11 Kwikfish® and Brad’s® Wigglers.  Another technique that is gaining popularity is to vertically jig for these fish.  Using jigs in the 2 to 4 ounce range will drop your gear to the bottom and jig up as you float downstream with the current, some days this technique drives fish crazy.

    Bass fishing is going to start getting better and better as the warm weather continues.  The Columbia and Willamette really are world class smallmouth bass fisheries, once the water warms up a little more the fishing usually is nothing short of amazing.  Lipless crankbaits, tubes, senkos and shallow diving crankbaits are all great options when targeting these pre-spawn smallmouths.

    Trout fishing has also picked up with the warmer weather.  In most local lakes the early morning will be an awesome time to target these fish.  The trout like to cruise the shorelines looking for easy meals, and a well-placed spinner or fly can be all they need to be enticed into biting.  Another option is to troll a small Wedding Ring®, Flatfish® or Mag Lips.  Trolling can be a super effective way to key in on what the trout are after, it is also an easy way to get the younger generations into fishing while they are still learning to cast.

    Bottom fishing has been getting better now that the ocean has finally calmed down a little bit and anglers have been able to get out.  This time of year is when you can catch good numbers of both sea bass and lingcod.  Going home with a pile of fillets is a good possibility.

    Kokanee fishing has been good with a lot of the lower elevation lakes fishing well while many of the higher elevation lakes are still thawing out.  When the water is still cool, you can usually find Kokanee in the higher parts of the water column.  Dodgers and Wiggle Hoochies™, Wedding Rings® or small Brad’s® Cut Plugs are just a few of the many options when picking out what to use for targeting Kokanee.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.

    Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Apr 27, 2018 | by Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 4/19

    Fisherman’s Oregon City employee Trevor LaValley headed to Eastern Oregon for some Brown Trout action. Fisherman’s Oregon City employee Trevor LaValley headed to Eastern Oregon for some Brown Trout action.

    Last week all the rain we had caused most of the local rivers to rise and turn muddy.  Even though the Willamette is high and off color, if you get a herring, anchovy or prawn spinner in front of a spring chinook he will eat it.  We had reports from the few boats that fished the Lower Willamette and there were spring chinook caught this week.  Most of the fish have come from the Portland Harbor, Multnomah Channel and Meldrum Bar.  When targeting these dirty water springers, fishing high in the water column is usually a good place to start.  Bright colored flashers, triangle or 360°, are usually a good bet with either herring, anchovies or prawns.  These fish are going to be slow-moving and waiting around for the water to clean up, so even if you don’t get a bite on your first or second pass, keep trolling as it can be hard to get your bait directly in front of an individual fish.  For those that don’t want to get out in the dirty water, it is a great time clean up your gear and stock up on bait and pre-tied leaders.  The more prepared you are, the more time you will spend actually fishing when on the water.

    A couple other fisheries to keep an eye on are the Wind River and Drano Lake fisheries.  A few days after we see a jump in fish passing over Bonneville Dam both fisheries will get going.  Normal trolling rigs with herring, prawns or anchovies work well here.  Another popular option is trolling a Mag Lip® or Kwikfish® behind a boat.  The fish will move into these fisheries and hang out for a decent amount of time before moving upriver so sometimes a spinner, Mag Lip® or Kwikfish® will entice the fish to bite.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing is still reliable. With a lot of quality fish being caught in the Portland Harbor area.  Squid, smelt and herring have all been popular choices this last week.

    Local trout lakes continue to get stocked and the fishing has been great for those that have been battling the rain.  PowerBait®, worms and salmon eggs have all been good options when fishing the bottom or with a bobber.  Another option is to cast Rooster Tails®, Kastmasters or small Blue Fox® spinners along shorelines.  Cruising trout love to eat hardware, especially early in the morning.  Check your local stocking schedules for up to date stocking info.

    This Saturday the 21st is the Long Beach Clam Festival and along with the festival are some minus tides and the last digs of the season for Washington’s Razor Clam beaches. See more info at the links:
    http://longbeachrazorclam
    festival.com/2018-event-schedule/
    https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing
    /shellfish/razorclams/current.html

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.

    Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Apr 20, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 4/12

    Fisherman's Pro Staff Guide, Craig Augustynovich, with a nice Southern Oregon gobbler. Fisherman's Pro Staff Guide, Craig Augustynovich, with a nice Southern Oregon gobbler.

    April 15th is the start of Oregon general Spring Turkey Season. The season runs through May 31 statewide. For more information go to http://www.eregulations.com
    /oregon/game-bird/game-bird-seasons/

    The Willamette River is super high and off color, with the turbidity being so high the salmon fishing has been brought to a stand still as we all wait patiently for things to come back into shape.  With that being the case, now is the perfect time to get all your gear in tip top shape, leaders pre-tied, gear cleaned, plugs washed and hooks sharpened, because once the Willamette clears up and drops, the fishing should be great.  In the Portland Harbor and Multnomah Channel most, anglers will be trolling herring, prawns, anchovies or spinners with either a triangle flasher or a 360° Flasher.  These fish will be eager to bite as they should be fresh out of the Columbia and headed to the Oregon City falls.  The Milwaukie area will be another great place to troll using the same method, prawns, herring, anchovies, spinners and Superbaits will all be great options there.  For those that want to fish Oregon City, the majority will be backtrolling eggs and sand shrimp or prawns.  Another great option is to fish smaller plugs such as Mag Lips®, K11 Kwikfish® and Wiggle Warts®.  Once the fish get into Oregon City they can, at times, become finicky biters so having a few different flavors of eggs or a variety of scents to find what they want can make or break the day.  Another newer technique is to vertically jig for these fish in the deeper water.  Using 2-4 ounce jigs and jigging them off the bottom can be a super fun way to fish.  Swing by one of our tackle departments and they can help square you away with the correct jigs.

    Another option when the rivers are blown out, is to go catch and release some sturgeon.  When the rivers are blown there are plenty of hungry sturgeon down in the Portland Harbor that need to be fed.  Squid, herring, smelt and sand shrimp are all great options when targeting sturgeon.  When the water is high and off color be mindful of what may come floating down river, you never know when a tree or root ball may show up.

    Trout fishing is another great choice for when the rivers are high and muddy.  Going to your local lake can be a fun change of pace as well as a fantastic opportunity to get your children or grandchildren out on the water.  Trolling small Flatfish®Mag Lips® or Wedding Rings® are all effective options.  When the sun comes out in the middle of the day, switching to fishing bait on the bottom may be your best option.  PowerBait®, nightcrawlers, salmon eggs or even cocktail shrimp are all good bait options.  Be sure to check your local stocking schedule to find out what’s been stocked the most recent.

    Once we get a break in the weather and the ocean will cooperate, the bottom fishing can be spectacular this time of year. Shrimp flies, curly tail grubs and jigs are all good options when targeting rock fish.  The lingcod and black bass fishing has been exceptional for those that have been able to get out recently.

    Another option at the coast right now is surf perch, these tasty fish are an awesome way to mix it up when you are on vacation at the coast or just wanting to try something different.  These fast swimming critters spend most of their time in the surf so they bite quickly and move fast.  Sharp hooks and the correct bait will keep you in the game when targeting these guys.  Sand shrimp, nightcrawlers and most of the Berkeley Gulp Saltwater products will work well for these fish.  Especially the Berkeley Gulp Sandworms.

    The Columbia River above Bonneville has been turning out some great Smallmouth Bass. Expect that when the Willamette River drops and clears, the smallies will be on the hunt as well.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.

    Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Apr 12, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report