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  • Kendra from our Oregon City store teamed up with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Jerry Toman, on August 16th to make this nice catch of Chinook near Astoria! Kendra from our Oregon City store teamed up with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Jerry Toman, on August 16th to make this nice catch of Chinook near Astoria!

    Salmon fishing in Astoria is heating up!  There seem to be more chinook on every tide set, so things should blow wide open here any day.  Those that have been fishing out closer to the actual Buoy 10 have been getting a few coho, so when the fishery changes to a coho only fishery on the 24th, there will definitely be some around.  For the chinook fishermen, most folks are trolling either herring or anchovies in combination with a triangle flasher.  Some people are using 360 Flashers when the tide slows down at either low or high slack, as these fish will typically suspend up off of the bottom so these flashers definitely work well during that time period.

    As the month progresses the fish move up river and the wobbler fishermen will start to chip away at the packs of fresh chinook moving upstream.  These fish move the hardest on an outgoing tide and will get pushed flat to the bottom from the pressure of the current.  Finding under water seams or long flat sections of 35’-55’ feet of water will be your best bet at intercepting these fish.  Once the tide slacks up then you can definitely start trolling for them with either triangle or 360 Flashers and small spinners or Brad's Super Bait Cut Plugs®.

    The summer steelhead fishing continues to be good in the Columbia.  A lot of fishermen have transferred over to targeting chinook, but that just means the steelhead that are still coming up river are seeing very few steelhead type baits.  Fishing coon stripe shrimp continues to be the most popular bait with small spinners and plugs being the second and third options.  There are also the cold water fisheries that become popular up in the Gorge this time of year.  Herman Creek and Drano Lake are popular because of the cold water influences that these summer steelhead love to hang out in.  These are primarily bobber fisheries with coon stripe shrimp and jigs being the two popular options.

    Bottom fishing continues to be great out in the ocean.  For those that still want to scratch that itch, bottom fishing is a fun and easy way to fill the fish box for fish tacos or fish and chips.  Shrimp flies, vertical jigs or large curly tail grubs have all been productive lately.

    Crabbing is getting better and better with the crabs definitely starting to fill out more.  We have had reports of large keepers being taken up and down the coast.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 16, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, with a nice Chinook caught a couple of days ago near Astoria, Oregon. Salmon fishing is off to a great start at Buoy Ten, and should only get better in the coming days. Fish on! (Northwest Angling Experience and Chris V: 503-349-1377.) Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, with a nice Chinook caught a couple of days ago near Astoria, Oregon. Salmon fishing is off to a great start at Buoy Ten, and should only get better in the coming days. Fish on! (Northwest Angling Experience and Chris V: 503-349-1377.)

    Astoria is already fishing well with most of the catch being nice chinook.  Not a lot of coho have been in the catch yet as they are still staging just off the mouth, waiting to come inside.  The chinook fishing in the river has been good with many anglers using either bait or spinners.  The bait guys have been divided with half the fleet using anchovies and half the fleet using herring. Most anglers choose to brine their herring to try and separate their bait from everyone else’s. Fisherman’s Marine has lots of options for brining herring, just swing by and pick your poison, the tackle staff will be happy to help.  The spinner fleet has also been divided with half the fleet using smaller 3.5 size spinners and the other half using larger size 6-6.5 size spinners.  Both sizes have been working, so it’s just a matter of what you have more confidence in.  The amount of fish in the estuary keeps building every tide set, so the fishing will continue to get better and better every day.

    Locally the steelhead fishing on the Columbia has been very consistent with people having good success from the Cathlamet all the way to Bonneville.  Most anglers are fishing coon stripe shrimp paired with a Spin-n-Glo for added attraction.  These fish are typically great biters, so it turns into a game of finding where the fish are running and getting your gear in their way. Small Flatfish, K11 Kwikfish, Wiggle Warts or Mag Lips are all great options for these chrome-bright summer steelhead.

    Ocean fishing has been great for those chasing salmon.  In the Astoria area and along the coastline, the coho fishing has been killer with lots of nice solid fish in the mix and chinook being caught as well.  There are some anglers that are catching their coho limits so fast that they will target also bottom fish, usually lingcod or seabass. Large Curly Tail Grubs and shrimp flies will be the most popular seabass tackle, and large Curly Tail Grubs and large jigs are what most folks are using to target lingcod.

    NOTE:  DUE TO THE HOT COHO BITE IN THE OCEAN, THE QUOTA IS EXPECTED TO BE REACHED, AND THE OCEAN OFF THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA, WILL CLOSE SUNDAY EVENING FOR COHO AND CHINOOK.
    For more info:  https://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp
    /salmon/updatesnew.asp

    Trout fishing has also remained steady with an abundance of stocked fish available.  Lake fishing for trout is a fun way to spend a weekend with the family.  Troll around some Wedding Rings or small Flatfish and you will be able to have consistent action to keep the kids busy.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

     

    Aug 10, 2018 | by FMO STAFF
  • Outdoor Report 8/2

    Coho and Chinook salmon are currently massing off the mouth of the Columbia River and are starting to pulse up the river on their fall migration, meaning the famous Buoy 10/Astoria salmon fishery will continue to improve in the coming days. These guys fished the ocean this past Tuesday with Fisherman’s Pro Staffer, Chris Vertopoulos, and were rewarded with a limit of delicious Coho! (Northwest Angling Experience and Chris V: 503-349-1377.) Coho and Chinook salmon are currently massing off the mouth of the Columbia River and are starting to pulse up the river on their fall migration, meaning the famous Buoy 10/Astoria salmon fishery will continue to improve in the coming days. These guys fished the ocean this past Tuesday with Fisherman’s Pro Staffer, Chris Vertopoulos, and were rewarded with a limit of delicious Coho! (Northwest Angling Experience and Chris V: 503-349-1377.)

    Wednesday marked the beginning of the Buoy 10/Astoria salmon fishery. We have been getting reports of good fishing in the ocean, just off the Columbia River, along with spotty action in the river. All indicators are showing that we should be in for a decent start to this fishery, and there are a number of ways that people will target these chinook and coho. The most popular choices are trolling with lead or delta divers with either a spinner, herring, anchovy or Super Bait behind them. These fish will change where they are in the water column depending on where the tide is pushing them, which means you may need to change your depths at times to dial in where the fish are at.

    As these fish move their way up the Columbia the outgoing tide will push them straight to the bottom, and a lot of anglers switch over to trolling. As the tides switch and slack up, then turn to incoming, the fish start to suspend more. Either triangle flashers or 360° flashers are usually used with Super Baits, Cut-Plugs, small spinners or small herring.

    Summer steelhead are still storming up river and those that don’t want to travel to the coast have a great opportunity to catch summer steelhead along the banks of the Columbia. Coon stripe shrimp and small plugs will be your go-to offerings. Be ready, you never know when Mr. Chinook will decide he wants to play; with large upriver brights entering Astoria daily, the next bite could be a 40lber!

    Trout fishing locally has been consistent. Most anglers are focusing their efforts on either early morning or late evening, trolling small plugs, spinners or wedding rings as the fish are more active during these times. During the heat of the day, plunking bait on the bottom will be one of your best options, because the fish will seek the cool waters of the deeper parts of the lake.

    Bottom fishing remains excellent along the coast line with lots of great reports coming in. Rock fish and lingcod are both around in good numbers with the occasional shallow water halibut keeping things interesting. For those headed to the salt to chase salmon, bringing some bottom fishing gear makes a great add on to your trip.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 03, 2018 | by FMO STAFF
  • Outdoor Report 7/26

    Summer steelhead are currently available in the Columbia River and many of its tributaries, and fishing plugs like the Yakima MagLip pictured here is a great way to target them! Summer steelhead are currently available in the Columbia River and many of its tributaries, and fishing plugs like the Yakima Mag Lip pictured here is a great way to target them!

    Summer steelhead fishing in the Columbia has remained consistent this week, a good number of fish were taken, especially from the lower Columbia.  These fish are running in shallower water and on a one-way mission up river.  Summer steelhead are typically very aggressive and all you must do is get your bait in front of them.  Coon stripe shrimp and prawns are the most popular baits along with small hot orange plugs or small inline spinners.

    The Buoy 10/Astoria salmon fishery opens in just a few short days.  Make sure you have all your gear in check and ready to roll because the first few tide sets really look promising.  We have had reports of decent size coho out in the ocean already, so I wouldn’t be surprised if there are some nice coho caught in the first few weeks of the fishery.  Green label herring and anchovies are the two most popular bait choices; sometimes the tides get rolling hard so bringing leaders pre-rigged with herring/anchovy helmets can pay huge dividends.  Flashers are another big deal down there. On certain days fish will key in on UV flashers and other days they will prefer the old school style with no UV, having both on board can quickly turn your day around.  Spinners are another great tool to have when fishing this fishery.  The smaller 3.5 spinners are all the rage these days, but don’t be afraid to run larger blades in the 6-6.5 range.  The larger blades put off a lot of thump underwater and can, at times, be the game changer you need. As always if you need helping rigging up any of these setups swing by Fisherman’s tackle department and they can get you dialed in.

    Trout fishing in most local lakes has been productive with many lakes receiving multiple rounds of plantings.  These fish are usually the most active first thing in the morning and last thing before dark.  Trolling Wedding Rings and night crawlers, small plugs, or even flies are all great options for these active fish.  As the day progresses a lot of these trout will sink down and get close to the bottom.  Fishing  PowerBait, worms, Gulp products and salmon eggs are all great choices to plunk off the bottom.

    Bottom fishing remains great along the coast line with lots of anglers catching limits of bass and lingcod.  There are also those targeting shallow water halibut and we have had reports of some real quality halibut being caught.  Large herring have been the most poplar bait for targeting halibut and as far as the bottom fish are concerned curly tail grubs, shrimp flies and vertical jigs are among the most popular baits.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jul 27, 2018 | by FMO STAFF
  • Outdoor Report 7/19

    Two of our longtime Pro Staff Guides are in the same boat, doing some damage! Brian Campbell and Terry Mulkey, show off a beautiful summer run steelhead from a productive morning on the water. Two of our longtime Pro Staff Guides are in the same boat, doing some damage! Brian Campbell and Terry Mulkey, show off a beautiful summer run steelhead from a productive morning on the water.

    There have been reports of summer steelhead being caught locally all over the Columbia River. Coon stripe shrimp is the most predominant bait; however, prawn tails also work well. If you’re not into fishing bait then fishing spinners, Mag Lips, Flatfish or Kwikfish are all great options when chasing these acrobatic and tasty fish.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been fantastic in the Astoria area.  The people that are down there chasing them are having great success finding fish with anchovies or sand shrimp.  Remember that these fish are fresh off the tide, so make sure you bring the right gear.  Heavy salmon rods are great options if you’re targeting these fish in shallow water.  However, if you transition to deeper water it may be a good idea to have a little heavier rod, as these fish pull hard and will use the current to their advantage. 

    Near shore halibut fishing has been great for those out targeting them, and when the ocean allows, the lingcod and rock bass fishing remains excellent.  Also, the crabbing has been quite good, with the crabs getting fuller as we progress through summer.

    Locally, both the Sandy and the Clackamas have a few summer steelhead and spring chinook in them.  On the Clackamas fish are spread throughout the system so you can explore your favorite spots with confidence. However, the water is getting warm so your best chance at getting into fish is either early in the morning or late in the evening. The Sandy also has had fish throughout the system, but with the high temperatures we are having the river will be very glacial, so, trying lower in the river may be advantageous.

    Trout fishing remains consistent with some of the best action being in the higher mountain lakes.  With clear skies and warm weather, the early morning and late evening bites will be the best.  In the middle of the day, your best option will be to fish bait off the bottom in the deeper parts of the lake because the fish will take to the deep, dark, cool water to hunker down and wait out the hot temperatures.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jul 19, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 7/12

    Bottom fishing remains excellent off the coast as conditions allow. Here's Fisherman's Pro Guide, Josh Putman, with a nice cabezon caught from his dory out of Pacific City. (Josh Putman Guide Service: 503-708-1141.) Bottom fishing remains excellent off the coast as conditions allow. Here's Fisherman's Pro Guide, Josh Putman, with a nice cabezon caught from his dory out of Pacific City. (Josh Putman Guide Service: 503-708-1141.)

    The Columbia River remains consistent for summer steelhead, with fish being caught from Bonneville to Cathlamet.  Most folks are targeting these fish close to the shoreline and some fish are being caught just a few feet off the bank.  Cured coon stripe shrimp, prawn tails or sand shrimp are the most popular baits.  If you do not want to mess with bait, then running spinners or plugs will be your best options. Flash Glo spinners are a popular choice as are Flatfish, K11 Kwikfish, Brad’s Wigglers or Mag Lips.  Using scent will help your chances when fishing spinners or plugs.  Sand shrimp, prawn, anise or crawfish are all popular scents to use for the feisty summer steelhead.

    At the coast the bottom fishing remains stellar with lots of larger lingcod caught this week.  The near-shore halibut fishing has also been good with some boats finding limits of nice, fat halibut to accompany their bottom fish.  Salmon are being caught in the ocean as well, and the fishing will continue to get better and better the farther along we get into July.  Herring or anchovies are the most popular bait, trolled behind a triangle flasher of your choice.  It may take a little time to find the schools of salmon, but when you do, the fishing can be lights out!

    For those that are going to be camping at the beach this summer, you can easily catch rockfish and lingcod off the many jetties along the Oregon/Washington coast.  Using Curly Tail Grubs or vertical jigs are popular choices.  Walking up and down the jetty will pay dividends as the fish tend to move around a lot with the tides.  Just exercise caution and be alert for “sneaker” waves!

    Another great coastal option is to go after some delicious surf perch. Most people find that surf perch fishing is best on the incoming tide, so if you want to have a short day on the water it makes it easy.  The best baits are usually sand shrimp, clam necks or the Berkley Gulp! Sandworms.

    Catch-and-release sturgeon fishing remains stellar in the lower Columbia.  These fish fight extremely hard, are aggressive biters and tend to go airborne when hooked!  This is a great fishery for anybody, from experienced anglers to first time fishermen.  Sand shrimp and anchovies are the most popular baits, with herring and squid coming in second.

    Locally, trout fishing has been a little tougher with the higher temps outside and the bite has been more of an early morning or late-evening program. At the high mountain lakes, the fishing has been a bit better, with cooler evenings and mornings the fish have been on the bite more.  Casting spinners, fly fishing and trolling have been the best techniques lately.

    Walleye fishing remains excellent in the Columbia River Gorge. Fish on!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

     

    Jul 12, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 7/5

    Fisherman's Pro Guide, Josh Putman, with a delicious lingcod caught from his dory out of Pacific City. Bottom fishing remains excellent off the coast as conditions allow. (Josh Putman Guide Service: 503-708-1141.) Fisherman's Pro Guide, Josh Putman, with a delicious lingcod caught from his dory out of Pacific City. Bottom fishing remains excellent off the coast as conditions allow. (Josh Putman Guide Service: 503-708-1141.)

    Steelhead fishing on the Columbia has been consistent, with people having good success from Cathlamet all the way to Bonneville.  Most anglers are fishing coon stripe shrimp paired with a Spin-n-Glo or small Smile Blade for added attraction.  These fish are typically great biters so it turns into a game of finding where the fish are running and just getting your gear in their way.  Small Flatfish, K11 Kwikfish, Wiggle Warts or Mag Lips are also great options for these chrome bright summer steelhead.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been exceptional in the Astoria area, with action being fast & furious.  Sand shrimp and anchovies are by far the most popular baits down in the estuary, though squid and herring are also good to have on board.  Paying attention to the tides will be greatly beneficial in this fishery because the fish will change location depending on the tide.

    Ocean fishing has been great for those chasing bottom fish, lingcod and sea bass. Large Curly Tail grubs and shrimp flies are the most popular sea bass tackle, and large Curly Tail grubs and large jigs are what most folks are using to target lingcod.

    Trout fishing has also remained consistent with lakes continuing to get stocked.  Lake fishing for trout is a fun way to spend a weekend with the family.  Troll around some Wedding Rings or small Flatfish and you will be able to have fairly consistent action to keep the kids busy.

    Walleye fishing continues to produce, specifically higher up the Columbia River.  Many anglers are trolling worm harness rigs when searching for schools of walleye.  Once the fish have been located, jigging can also be effective.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jul 06, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 6/28

    Customer Tom Roper recently caught this nice Columbia River Chinook and summer steelhead fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, of Northwest Angling Experience. (503-349-1377.) Customer Tom Roper recently caught this nice Columbia River Chinook and summer steelhead fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, of Northwest Angling Experience. (503-349-1377.)

    Chinook fishing has reopened on the Columbia and there have been some pretty decent results. Most anglers have been anchor fishing, and in the lower river they are using bait wrapped plugs or wobblers. The plugs include Kwikfish®, Mag Lips®, Flatfish® and Killerfish®, and the wobblers include Simon®, Alvin, Brad’s® and Clancy. Most anglers use sardines to wrap their plugs but there are lots of alternatives including herring, prawns and tuna. The closer you get to Bonneville, the more the anglers are divided into two groups, the spinner guys and the plug guys. Having both options on board is a good idea as each technique will depend on the speed of water you anchor in.

    People are having good luck targeting summer steelhead on the Columbia. Prawns or coon stripe shrimp are the most popular two baits either from the boat or from the bank. Find a good cut off point or shallow water flat and you will be in good shape to intercept some aggressive steelhead.

    Walleye fishing has been great, especially the farther up the Columbia River Gorge you go. Some anglers are jigging, but most of them are trolling bottom walkers with worm harnesses. Trolling enables you to cover the most ground to find the walleye.

    Ocean chinook fishing started last week and the boats that made it out found decent chinook fishing with a good grade of fish already. The fishing should continue to get better the farther along we get into July.

    Trout fishing remains consistent with a lot of anglers finding success on high mountain lakes. Many of these lakes have plenty of newly planted trout along with hold over trout. Hold over trout are typically fatter, bigger and smarter, as they have spent well over a year in the lake. They can be fun to target because they are wary, and therefore they are very rewarding to catch. Casting spinners is a great technique, especially early in the mornings. Fly fishing is also another good option. Trolling Mag Lips® or Flatfish® are another great technique as they fish can give you an impressive takedown.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jun 28, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 6/21

    Beautiful and delicious, brook trout are currently biting lures, bait or flies at the high lakes. Beautiful and delicious, brook trout are currently biting lures, bait or flies at the high lakes.

    Summer steelhead fishing in the Columbia has been consistent this last week, with a good number of fish being taken, specifically from the Lower Columbia.  These fish are running in shallow water and are on a one-way mission to get up river.  Summer steelhead are typically very aggressive; coon stripe shrimp and prawns are the most popular baits along with small hot-orange plugs or small inline spinners.  Be prepared to hook an incidental Chinook or two as they also love to eat shrimp.

    Chinook Fishing opens back up on the Columbia June 22nd.  The fishing looks to be promising as these Chinook haven’t been pressured by anglers since the last opener.  Chinook-sized plugs, spinners and prawn spinners are popular lures to use for Spring and Summer Chinook.

    In most of the local lakes trout fishing has been productive; nearly all the lakes have received their first rounds of planter trout.  These fish are usually the most active at dawn and dusk.  Trolling Wedding Rings® and night crawlers, small plugs, or even flies are great options for these active fish.  As the day progresses, trout tend to sink down and get close to the bottom.  Fishing PowerBait® Worms, Gulp!®products and salmon eggs are great for plunking off the bottom.

    Smallmouth bass are in-between stages right now, some have spawned and some are spawning.  This means they are extremely aggressive and willing to bite.  Soft plastics, lipless or shallow diving crankbaits and even topwater baits are great for fishing shallow water bass.  Search the shorelines until you find biting fish and stay on them, switching up techniques.

    Bottom fishing remains great off the coast with many anglers catching limits of bass and lingcod.  Some are also targeting shallow-water halibut and we have had reports of some quality halibut being caught.  Large herring have been the most popular bait for targeting halibut and as far as the bottom fish are concerned, curly tail grubs, shrimp flies and vertical jigs are among the most effective.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jun 22, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 6/14

    Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Dave Maroon, shows off a huge Walleye caught and released on the Columbia river. The Columbia is still quite high, but those that are willing to put the time in can definitely be rewarded. Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Dave Maroon, shows off a huge Walleye caught and released on the Columbia river. The Columbia is still quite high, but those that are willing to put the time in can definitely be rewarded.

    This past week Chinook Fishing came to a close on the Columbia from Bonneville dam to Astoria. Many anglers found great success up and down the river. Most anglers targeting Chinook exclusively were anchored up in water depths from 8’-25’ of water and were mainly using salmon size plugs. Kwikfish®, Killerfish®, Mag Lips® and Flatfish® are just a few of the popular plugs that will be used when targeting summer/spring Chinook. Be sure to wrap your plug with either sardine, herring, anchovy or prawn. Keeping a good scent trail can be vital to your success this time of year. The Columbia will re-open on the 22nd of June and a lot of folks expect the fishing to be quite good, especially with the Chinook getting a break from the angling pressure for a few days. While the Chinook fishing will be closed, the summer steelhead fishery is going and will remain open for retention. Those that are chasing steelhead are typically in a bit shallower water, ranging from 6’-15’ of water. These summer steelhead tend to hug the shoreline so you will see most fishermen pressed against the bank. Small coon stripe shrimp, small spinners or small steelhead size plugs will round out the average steelhead fisherman’s tackle box. Also bringing along a couple of different scent options will be a good idea as sometimes the fish will key in on one scent over another.

    Shad fishing remains excellent on the Columbia and on the Willamette. These hard fighting fish are great fun and provide a great opportunity for the whole family to get in on the action. Once you find the line the fish are running in, the action will typically be non- stop. Small bright colored jig heads, small spoons such as Dick Nites® or Baby Simons® or even flicker spinners are great terminal tackle options.

    Kokanee fishing locally has continued to be good with fish all up and down the water column. Small Wedding Rings®, Brads Kokanee Cut-Plugs® and Wiggle Woochies™ are great options when choosing terminal tackle. Put any of these behind a dodger of your choosing and you will be in the game. Make sure to tip your offering with one or two kernels of shoepeg corn and the Kokanee will have a hard time leaving you alone.

    Trout fishing continues to be good as the high mountain lakes are becoming accessible and the trout are hungry! These fish haven’t seen any lures or bait since last fall so they are typically very aggressive. Trolling is a great option with small Mag Lips®, Flatfish® or Blue Fox® spinners all working well. For those that are bank bound, casting Rooster Tails®, Kastmasters® or bobber and bait will all provide great action especially in the lakes that haven’t had much pressure yet.

    Walleye fishing up in the gorge has been great. Most anglers are finding their success trolling worm harnesses and bottom walkers, others that prefer to jig are also catching fish. Make sure to rig your worm harness with bright colored beads or Corkies® as the Columbia is still a little off color so adding some color will help the walleye find your offering.

    Bottom fishing has been great, when the ocean allows people to get out and fish for them. Shrimp flies, vertical jigs and lead head jigs with a large curly tail grub are among the many options of rigs to choose from when chasing bottom fish. Once you find a few biters try to stay on top of them as the action can typically be fast and furious.

    Sturgeon fishing has closed for retention, however for those that are wanting to go catch a bunch of hard fighting fish, the catch and release fishery offers amazing opportunity. Sand shrimp, herring and anchovies are the three most popular baits choices.

    This weekend has some minus tides that should be good for clamming. Oregon’s beaches, above the mouth of the Yachats River, are still open for Razor Clams. Northern beaches like Clatsop Spit would be a great bet for digging them this weekend. Bay Clams are also available and you can have a great combo trip in some bays, collecting clams at low tides and crabbing through the flood tides. Find out the regulations, how and where to clam at https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/crabbing-clamming-report/marine-zone

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Jun 15, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report