Shopping Cart

Search
hidden-link

Blog/Reports

  • Outdoor Report 11/16

    Sean from our Oregon City store, a recent transplant from Minnesota is checking new species off his list in the Pacific Northwest! He caught and released this nice wild coho on the Clackamas River last week. Sean from our Oregon City store, a recent transplant from Minnesota is checking new species off his list in the Pacific Northwest! He caught and released this nice wild coho on the Clackamas River last week.

    A lot of the chinook have moved into the rivers now, but you can still find fall chinook at the coast. The rivers will continue to fish for the next few weeks, as the water level starts to go down plug fishing will be the go-to. When backtrolling using larger plugs like Kwikfish and Killerfish in size 16, or large Hawgnose Flatfish will help shake off the leaves that are still in the water.  After the water drops even more bobber fishing will be a better choice, as the water should be clearer, and then shrimp and eggs will be the go-to.

    There are fish to be caught in Tillamook Bay, however the fishing will start to drastically taper off in the next few weeks.  Anglers in the bay are still fishing herring and spinners, but more and more are starting to fish 360° flashers and small 3.5 spinners.  These late run Tillamook fish can be some of the biggest of the year, while there may not be the numbers that the early season has, the size of these fish can make up for it.

    The Cowlitz and Lewis Rivers are both right in the middle of their second run of coho. These fish are big, bright and aggressive.  Techniques such as twitching jigs, spinners and casting wiggle warts will be among the top producers.  Eggs are always effective for coho but if you’re looking at a fishery to conserve your bait, this can be one of those.  These fish are typically aggressive enough that jigs, spinners and plugs will be sufficient for bringing home some fish for the grill.

    Winter steelhead are starting to poke their heads into the tributaries.  We have had reports from nearly every local river that there have been steelhead caught.  Not huge numbers by any means, however for this early in November, we have had enough reports to start talking about them.  These early fish are usually caught by anglers targeting late run coho.  Spinners, jigs and bait are all great options if you’re looking to target both species.  If you’re going out to specifically target winter steelhead, then fishing jigs or pink worms under a float work great, as well as your typical drift fishing rig.  Small hand tied yarnies, corkies and beads are all great choices to drift fish for these early fish.

    Ducks have been spread out with the sheet water created by recent rains, but we are in for a drying trend that should move the birds into more consistent bodies of water later this week. Some big storms earlier in the week on the coast should have moved some widgeon ducks inland a bit. This typically is the week water fowlers have a good chance to see some major migrations of Mallards in Western Oregon and Washington. Keep your eyes peeled.

    The average “ducks per hunter” number on the Sauvie Island management unit jumped to 2.9 on Monday.

    Before heading out make sure to check local regulations.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all be safe.

     

     

    Nov 16, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/9

    FMO customer, Greg Aton from Spokane Washington, with a mixed bag of ducks taken last weekend while hunting the Oregon Coast. FMO customer, Greg Aton from Spokane Washington, with a mixed bag of ducks taken last weekend while hunting the Oregon Coast.

    Coastal fall Chinook is still going and this week’s rain and large tides should bring in another wave of fresh fish. Tillamook Bay is still producing some Chinook, but this late in the season the fish are feeling the urgency to get to the gravel and are moving quickly to the rivers. It is possible to catch chrome Chinook in the bay clear into December, though numbers normally start to dwindle from here on out.

    Herring, either with or without a Fish Flash, has still been producing fish at the jaws, Ghost Hole and Bay City, though the bay fishes best near the jaws on smaller tides. The Pro Troll/small spinner phenomenon has also taken off on coastal bays and tidewater, where great success was realized this fall by anglers switching over from more traditional techniques. While the color of flasher has not seemed to matter much on the coast, the Simon 3.5 spinners in “Mexican Hat” and “Rotten Banana” have been killers, and the Hildebrandt 3.5 Hoochie Spinners have also produced well in a variety of color schemes.

    North Coast streams are still producing some bright fish, but at this point you might have to release a few dark ones before striking chrome. Back-trolling Kwikfish, Mag Lips, Flatfish or Brad’s Killerfish will produce strikes, especially when the rivers are up and green and the fish are on the move. Wrapping your plugs with sardine is standard procedure when fishing plugs on coastal rivers, but sometimes it pays to be different and fish them “naked.” Same goes for bobber fishing or back-bouncing bait: adding sand shrimp, chunks of sardine, herring or anchovies along with your eggs can sometimes tip the scale in your favor. If the above doesn’t work, then try juicing-up your bait with your favorite scent to see if that turns on the fish. Anise, krill, garlic, shrimp, anchovy, herring and bloody tuna scents can all be very effective at times, and Fisherman’s has a huge selection of scents to choose from.

    Locally the Sandy and Clackamas are still putting out a very few hatchery coho, but things are definitely winding down and anglers are starting to think of winter steelhead, which, considering the recent winter-like weather, could be showing up any day now. Southwest Washington streams are still producing B-run coho, and fish are being caught on twitching jigs, roe, plugs, spinners and spoons. These large, aggressive coho can be vicious when conditions are right, so pick your favorite technique and give it a whirl! The Kalama, Lewis and Cowlitz have been fishing well.

    Chum salmon are currently available on some Oregon and Washington coastal rivers for catch and release fishing, but be sure to check the regulations for the river you intend to fish before heading out. While chum are not good eating once they return to the rivers, they are a hard-fighting and aggressive salmon that will strike a variety of lures. Chum are a great catch and release species for kids both young and old, and a pink or cerise Steelhead Scampi from B n R Tackle rigged under a float on a ¼-ounce jig head is usually all you will need to catch some. Pink and chartreuse jigs are also effective.

    We continue to hear rumors of a few winter steelhead being caught, but so far no hard evidence. With the traditional kickoff to winter steelhead season falling on Thanksgiving, it shouldn’t be long before we start to see some in local streams. The Clackamas always seems to produce some early fish, and the North Fork Nehalem is also a good bet for November steelhead.

    Sturgeon continue their seasonal migration into the Willamette River, and catch and release fishing for them has been very reliable of late. This is a great winter time local fishery for those suffering from cabin fever, where you can go pull on some really cool fish right in the backyard. Squid, sand shrimp, night crawlers, smelt and roll mop herring are all reliable baits, but it’s best to have two or three on hand to see what the fish prefer on any given day.

    As expected, last weekend’s storm riled up the ducks and hunters in western Oregon fared well.  The Sauvie Island Wildlife Area harvest statistics over the last couple of hunt days, jumped to 2.6 and 3.1 birds per hunter average. The scaup opener was timely as there are a lot of blue bills using the lower Columbia. Reports from that area and coastal bays are indicating that there are also lot of widgeon in the bag limits. Hunters are expecting more mallards in the bag limits as there have been many days with single digit temperatures just north of us in Calgary Alberta.

    Always check local regulations before heading out.

    Tight lines, shoot straight, and most of all, be safe!

    Nov 09, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/2

    Customer David Jidas recently caught this awesome Tillamook Bay fall Chinook while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, during the 33rd annual North Coast Rendezvous! Customer David Jidas recently caught this awesome Tillamook Bay fall Chinook while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, during the 33rd annual North Coast Rendezvous!

    Locally the coho fishing is starting to slow down, however, there are still bright fish being caught.  Most anglers have narrowed down their techniques to either casting twitching jigs or spinners, or bobber fishing eggs.  The water has cooled down to the point that these fish will readily bite well-presented offerings. Also, the B run of coho starts to move into the Cowlitz and the North Fork of the Lewis this time of the year.  These coho are typically a bit larger than their A run cousins.  They also have a willingness to bite! Most anglers like to target them with twitching jigs, side drifting eggs and casting or backtrolling plugs.  The rivers will be a little higher, therefore the fish will tend to spread out a bit more.  Casting plugs or spinners can be an exciting way to find biting groups of fish.  Once you find these groups of fish, switching to jigs, spoons or eggs will all yield bites

    At the coast fall chinook fishing is in full swing! A vast majority of the north coast bays have seen great fall chinook and coho fishing. Trolling spinners or herring are by far the most widely used baits in most of these bays. Trolling 360° flashers and small spinners has now become a common site in coastal bays. People have figured out that these techniques are deadly almost anywhere a salmon swims.

    Coastal rivers have also been fishing well. The water is slightly on the low side, consequently a lot of anglers have resorted to bobber fishing eggs and shrimp. Once the water comes back up, backtrolling Kwikfish or Mag Lips will become a very popular technique. Backtrolling plugs is one of the most exciting ways to catch fall chinook. These big, angry salmon seem to hate large plugs and will attack them with reckless abandon. Kwikfish in sizes 14, 15 or 16 and Mag Lips in sizes 4.0, 4.5 and 5.0 are among the most popular sizes for tributary fall chinook.

    Sturgeon fishing on the recent Columbia River retention days could best be described as challenging, though there were some nice fish caught. However, catch and release fishing for sturgeon on the Willamette River continues to improve as sturgeon migrate to the slightly warmer water of the Willamette, providing a great option for some solid action close to home. It’s always a good bet to have at least a couple of different baits when targeting sturgeon, and sand shrimp, smelt, squid, night crawlers and roll mop herring are all good bets for winter sturgeon angling. It’s also smart to bring along a few bottles of your favorite scent to “juice up” your bait from time to time.

    Clam Digging should be good this weekend. There are some good minus tides in the early evenings. Oregon beaches are open daily now and Washington has approved digs on their popular razor clam beaches for this weekend. To see the approved Washington seasons and proposed seasons go to http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing
    /shellfish/razorclams/current.html

    Last weekend, hunters on the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area averaged 1.8 birds per hunter. Hunters are looking for fresh migrating birds and a few more Teal have been showing in the area and in bag limits. Typically, Teal are in front of the migrating flocks. The numbers of fresh birds should increase in the coming weeks.

    Before heading out always check local regulations.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe.

    Nov 02, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/26

    Marissa from our Oregon City store showing off a beautiful Fall Chinook caught in Tillamook Bay while fishing with Fisherman’s Marine and Outdoor Pro Staff Guide Jim Nicol. Marissa from our Oregon City store showing off a beautiful Fall Chinook caught in Tillamook Bay while fishing with Fisherman’s Marine and Outdoor Pro Staff Guide Jim Nicol.

     

    This last week we finally had some substantial rain!  As a matter of fact, we had just a bit more rain than we really wanted.  Tillamook rivers neared or went above flood stage as well as local Portland area rivers.  The Sandy and Clackamas are both dropping into shape nicely for this coming weekend.  Locally coho fishing has been average with anglers catching fish on a variety of techniques. Twitching jigs, bobber and eggs, drift fishing eggs, casting spinners or casting plugs have all been producing well.  We still have a few weeks left of the local coho fisheries and these can be some of the best weeks as the water cools down and the fish start to bite even more.

    Down in Tillamook the rains brought most rivers up to the point that fishing in the boat launch parking lot was a viable option.  As the rivers start to drop into prime shape there will be a few great techniques for the drift boat anglers to employ.  Backtrolling plugs is a super exciting way to target these brand new fall chinook.  These fish will slam a Kwikfish or Mag Lip with a vengeance, when backtrolled through a productive slot.  Also, anglers will be backbouncing while they backtroll.  This technique is a bit trickier to master but, it's a great option when you want to put your bait right in the face of the chinook.  The most widely used technique, all up and down the coast, is bobber fishing.  A lot of anglers will anchor up and bobber fish a good looking piece of water or they will float down river with their bobbers out in search of traveling fish.  Which ever technique you choose, be prepared for an amazing fight as these fish are sure to be brand new and in a hurry to get upriver.

    The bite will continue in Tillamook Bay and Nehalem Bay throughout the month of November with fish in all areas of the bay.  If you want to troll spinners the upper bay will be the place for you, while anglers wanting to spin a herring should target the lower bay. Anglers like to troll spinners in Nehalem Bay from Wheeler up through Tidewater.  Although the Ghost Hole in Tillamook Bay has traditionally been trolled with herring, anglers are finding a Pro-Troll and spinner to be the hot item this year.  Many our Pro Staff Guides have made the switch to that technique recently due to it’s success. A wide range of spinners can be used from 3.5 all the way up to size 8, so pick your favorite spinner and get trolling as there will be hungry chinook waiting. Those who prefer to troll herring will target the lower bay areas. In Nehalem Bay this means from Wheeler all the way to the jaws, while the jaws will be the most popular area to troll herring in Tillamook Bay.  Tillamook Bay has had some very large fish in it this year so people like to run a little bigger bait at times, this means running blue label herring instead of green. Fresh chinook entering the bays will be more than happy to eat a well-presented herring.

    For water fowlers, the recent wind and rain has made the early season feel more like a duck season should. Although we haven’t seen a big push of migrants yet, local numbers are average. The Sauvie Island Management area reported 2.8 birds per hunter on Opening Day and the most recent shoot day, October 24th had an average of 2.2 birds per hunter. Those numbers are normal for this time of year.

    Before heading out, be sure to check local regulations.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe!

    Oct 26, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/19

    Todd Liebow fished with Fisherman's Pro Guide Ted Teufel earlier this week and caught this exceptional 38-lb Tillamook Bay Fall Chinook! Expect some good salmon fishing on coastal rivers next week as rivers drop back into shape! Todd Liebow fished with Fisherman's Pro Guide Ted Teufel earlier this week and caught this exceptional 38-lb Tillamook Bay Fall Chinook! Expect some good salmon fishing on coastal rivers next week as rivers drop back into shape!

    The Fishing on the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam has still been quite productive for chinook and coho. Anglers fishing in the lower river have still been finding success with using 360° flashers and small 3.5 spinners or Brad’s Super Baits. One thing to consider, as more and more coho enter the lower Columbia, is to bring along some Wiggle Warts or casting spinners. There are times that you will find a pile of coho, especially at the mouths of tributaries. These fish will, at times, be super aggressive and you can either troll the Wiggle Warts or cast spinners to these fresh pods of fish. Up near Bonneville Dam the fishing has also been consistent for a lot of anglers. The 360° flasher trolling has been the most widely used technique up there, however the anglers that are anchoring or backtrolling Kwikfish and Mag Lips are also doing quite well. Kwikfish in size 15 and 16 are the most popular with Mag Lips in size 4.5 and 5.0 making up the other side of the tackle box.

    Sturgeon fishing will be open for retention two days this next week, October 21st and October 26th. The retention zone will be from the Wauna powerlines all the way up to the deadline below Bonneville Dam. The slot limit will be from 44-50 inches measuring from the fork length of the tail to the tip of the nose. The folks that have been pre-fishing them this last week reported that the fishing has been great. The most popular baits have been herring, smelt, squid and anchovies. If you need any help getting rigged up for sturgeon, swing by any of our three locations and our tackle staff can help get you dialed in.

    Tillamook Bay has been productive this week with a decent influx of fish with some very nice chinook weighing 30 pounds plus in the mix. This week’s coming rain will mix things up at the coast, the fish in the bay will surely squirt up into the rivers with more fish sure to follow as middle to late October can be prime time in the bay. Herring and spinners will be the best options for the bay. As for the rivers, backtrolling plugs or back bouncing bait are awesome techniques when the rivers have just come into shape and are running slightly dirty and high. Once the river levels recede a bit and start running clear again, bobber fishing bait or big salmon jigs are a pretty common technique to be using. Always check your local regulations at the coast as certain areas have different regulations than others.

    With these crisp mornings and cold evenings, the trout fishing has been great! Early morning or late evening trolling has been very productive while trolling small flatfishMag Lips, wedding rings or flys. This is the time of year that some very big trout get caught so always be ready for that next personal best to hit the net.

    Oct 19, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/12

    Longtime Fisherman's Pro Staff guide Chris Vertopoulos with a great Coastal Chinook. Longtime Fisherman's Pro Staff guide Chris Vertopoulos with a great Coastal Chinook.

    The Columbia is still kicking out brand new fall chinook.  There has been great success in the lower river, specifically the Woodland area.  Many are still trolling 360° flashers and spinners, however, there are many that have switched over to Brad’s Super Baits and  Brad’s Cut Plugs.  With the water cooling down fish will start to key in on bait a bit more than spinners, although, they will bite both regularly.  While targeting these chinook, a good number of silvers are being caught as well.  The silvers are eating the same things as the chinook are behind the 360° flashers. It is great to be able to effectively target both at the same time.  Bonneville Dam is still fishing well with fish being caught with a couple of different techniques.  It's sort of split down the middle with half running Kwikfish and the other half running 360° flashers.  Even though we are starting to see the chinook run start to dwindle in the lower river, the coho fishing will continue to be good for several more weeks.

    Coho have been in most of the local tributaries for some time now and fishing has been consistent.  Most people are fishing eggsspinners or twitching jigs, however don't pass up the opportunity to cast some plugs or even fly fish for them.  These fish can get finicky the longer they spend in fresh water, so make sure to bring a few techniques with you to throw at them.  The rain that we are getting now will only make the fishing better for these little chrome bullets.

    Tillamook has steadily been getting better over the last few weeks and will continue to fish well with the addition of this week’s rain.  These fish are fresh from the ocean and ready to bite.  Herring is still the bait of choice in the lower bay, Ghost Hole and the jaws, while the upper bay has been getting better and better for those trolling spinners Larger spinners have been the most productive, specifically sizes 66.5 and 7.  Toman and 
    Mulkey spinners have been the most rewarding as of late. Trying hoochie spinners is not a bad idea either, switching it up can sometimes really make them snap.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been very good locally. Smelt, sandshrimp, anchovies and squid have been the most productive baits recently, fish from small shakers to large oversize are being caught.
    ... Read more

    Oct 13, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/5

    There are still plenty of nice chinook around in the Columbia! These fish all fell victim to 360 flashers and spinners!

    There are still plenty of nice chinook around in the Columbia! These fish all fell victim to 360 flashers and spinners!

    The Columbia remains consistent with fish being caught throughout the system. Some of our Pro-Staff guides are reporting that there are still sea lice covered chinook coming up the lower river daily, that is a good sign for the next few weeks of fishing on the Columbia. As the water temperatures start to drop look for more fish to be caught with Super Baits rather than with spinners. Pick your favorite type of bait to put into the Super Bait and Super Cut-Plug. Another good option is to have multiple scents with you as these fish can get finicky. Bonneville Dam has also been very consistent, with fish being caught on Kwikfish as well as trolling 360° flashers with spinners or Super Baits. Some people will fish eggs and shrimp up there this time of year. However, the bait fish can be annoying when they pick at your bait so again having a variety of techniques on hand can pay dividends.

    Tillamook has also been consistent these last few weeks. The fishing has been a little tougher than in previous years, but the grade of fish this year has been above average. Herring continues to be the most popular bait, but as these fish move into the upper bay spinners will begin to be a productive technique. Mulkey and Toman spinners are among the most popular blades in Tillamook, these big fish love the thump of a large blade so don't be afraid to fish bigger size spinners.

    Once fish start to come through the bay and enter the rivers many will park the power boats and clean off the drift boats. These fish will enter the rivers when the water is just coming back into shape after a big deluge of rain. The first few fish will be hot and in a hurry to get upriver, backtrolling Kwikfish or back bouncing eggs and shrimp are popular ways to attract these fish. Some will backtroll Kwikfish in larger sizes such as 15 or 16, while others will use a size 5 Mag Lip or the Hawgnose. Once the water gets clear and lower in flow people will switch over to smaller plugs or anchor up to bobber fish eggs and shrimp. Keeping a variety of scent on hand is a good idea as being able to switch your scent can get stubborn fish to bite especially in heavy fished areas. Check the local regulations as a lot of coastal systems have different regulations regarding chinook retention.

    Trout fishing has been getting better by the week, as the evening temperatures are dropping the lake temperatures are cooling off nicely. Fishing bait has been productive as usual, however, those choosing to switch things up and troll the shorelines are finding a very nice grade of fish especially early and late in the day. These fish are packing on weight for the winter months and are often very willing biters.

    The proposed razor clam digs, have been approved by Washington. Oregon’s Clatsop Spit is also open and with the low tides this weekend, diggers should be successful.

    Be sure to check local regulations before heading out. Good luck and most of all be safe!

     

    Oct 06, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/27

    All Sports Salesman, Dan Radke with a Chinook caught in the Columbia River below Bonneville last Saturday. This dandy hit a Superbait trolled behind a Pro Troll flasher. Expect this type of fishing to be good well into October. All Sports Salesman, Dan Radke with a Chinook caught in the Columbia River below Bonneville last Saturday. This dandy hit a Superbait trolled behind a Pro Troll flasher. Expect this type of fishing to be good well into October.

    The Columbia has remained great this week.  Folks fishing from Astoria all the way up into the gorge have been experiencing great fishing.  The coho fishing has still been good down in Astoria.  A lot of people seem to forget about the amazing coho fishery that we have there all through September, but with a run of nearly 500,000 forecasted coho, this fishery can be awesome!  These fish will bite virtually anything when the schools move through, though typically, spinners and bait make up the majority of the bites down there. Target these fish suspended in the water column, as they will typically push in on big incoming tides and flush up river up off of the bottom.  Once you get above Warrior Rock the chinook fishing remains steady, with people doing extremely well with trolling spinners and Brad’s Super Baits.  Most fishermen are still trolling Shortbus Super Series or 11" Pro-Troll flashers on the incoming and outgoing tides. 

    Fishing below Bonneville Dam has still been good as well.  The fishermen are split down the middle with half of the fleet trolling 360° flashers and the other half fishing Kwikfish.  The Kwikfish guys are then split in half again, with half sitting on anchor and the other half backtrolling them with jumbo divers.  The good part is that everyone seems to be doing equally well, so pick your favorite technique and get after it.  There have been a lot of nice fish caught this last week so bring your “A” game.

    Tillamook has still been slower to start than usual, however, there are still fish being caught.  Most of the fish are still being taken down in the lower bay, Ghost Hole to the jaws.  Although, last week there was a push of fish that made it into the upper bay, and the few fishermen that fished there, ended up being rewarded with chrome results.  The vast majority of fishermen are still trolling around herring, but keeping some spinners on hand is a must, you never know when the bite might switch.

    Locally, coho have been making their way into the rivers and some fishermen have been experiencing good fishing.  These coho can be caught using a multitude of techniques including, jigs, eggs, spinners, plugs and beads.  Keeping a few techniques on hand when targeting coho can definitely be helpful as these fish are super finicky at times.  Starting with eggs is a great choice, and if they won't snap when seeing eggs, sometimes a spinner or plug can get a reaction.  Once we get some rain these fish will definitely go on the bite as they are on a one way mission to their hatcheries.

    Smallmouth bass angling on both the Willamette and Columbia Rivers has perked up recently with the cooler weather, as the fish are feeling the urgency to fatten up for winter. While drop-shotting plastics is a go-to method, the fish are also starting to hit crankbaits and spinnerbaits again.

    Trout fishing has been excellent lately at the Mt. Hood Lakes with the onset of autumn. Timothy Lake in particular has been putting out some large rainbows in the 2-5lb range. Try fishing a nightcrawler 3-6ft under a float in water 6-12ft deep along the shoreline.

    Washington has tentatively scheduled razor clam digs for the end of next week, Friday and Saturday. They are also looking to open four days in November and five days in December. You can check the dates on the WDFW website by going to http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/
    shellfish/razorclams/current.html

    Crabbing has been outstanding.

    Oregon’s general buck season and many of the controlled hunts open this weekend. The forecast for more rain is ideal for the hunters heading out opening weekend.

    As always, be sure to check local regulations before heading out. Tight lines, shoot straight and be careful out there.

    Sep 27, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/21

    Clients of FMO Pro Staff guide Josiah Darr with a great haul from the Columbia River which should remain hot for quite a few more weeks Clients of FMO Pro Staff guide Josiah Darr with a great haul from the Columbia River which should remain hot for quite a few more weeks

    Salmon fishing on the Columbia River has been amazing the last few days.  Folks targeting fall chinook have been having great success trolling as well as anchoring.  A majority of those that are trolling have been using 360 flashers with either small size 3.5 spinners, Brads Super Baits, Brads Cut Plugs or a Yakima Bait Spin-n-Glo.  These fishermen are predominantly targeting chinook on the incoming tide, once the tide switches a good portion of the fleet are dropping the anchor and fishing wobblers or spinners.  Both tides have been producing fish, it is mainly your preferred way of targeting these fish that determines what time you need to show up to the launch.  The closer you get to Bonneville Dam the tactics typically change a little bit.  While trolling the 360 flashers as mentioned above is still preferred by most, some prefer to anchor or backtroll Kwikfish typically in sizes 15 or 16.  The current can really get ripping up there so bring your “A” game.  Once above Bonneville a lot of fishermen will start to target the mouths of tributaries, while some will continue to troll others will be hover fishing bait.  Having good bait is a must in these fisheries and having a variety of scents can really pay off.

    Within the next few weeks there will be plenty of coho around to target.  They will readily bite spinners and Super Baits fished behind 360 flashers, as well as bait.  These fish can come into the river in big pushes and the action can be fast and furious.  From the mouth of the Cowlitz all the way to Bonneville Dam can be productive when targeting coho.

    Tillamook has started to fish better the last few days as well.  Fish are being caught consistently from the bubble, just outside the jaws, up to the Ghost Hole.  Most fish have been caught on herring, but as more fish begin to push into the upper bay the spinner bite will start to take off.

    Local trout fishing has begun to improve with the cooler evenings, as the water temperatures start to drop in the lakes the trout will start to bite better.  Bait will still be one of the most productive techniques, however, small flatfish, Rooster Tails or a slow trolled fly will also produce well.

    The recent rains and snow in higher elevations, should help the archery hunters in the field for the final weekend of Oregon general bow season which runs through Sunday Sept 24th. It is also going to help the rifle hunters heading into the field for the buck opener on September 30th.

    As always be sure to check your local regulations and be safe out there.

    Sep 21, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/14

    FMO employees Kimberly and Gwen show off some Columbia River Chinook caught above Bonneville while fishing with Josh Cooper of Cousin’s Rods. FMO employees Kimberly and Gwen show off some Columbia River Chinook caught above Bonneville while fishing with Josh Cooper of Cousin’s Rods.

    The whole lower Columbia River has been on a roll this week.  The fishermen down in Longview all the way to Bonneville Dam have been having great success.  Down in the Longview, Rainer area, most fishermen are anchoring with wobblers.  The typical set up is 5x5, five foot leader and five foot dropper length.  From the reports we are getting, it sounds like the majority of wobblers have been producing; Simon, Clancy’s and Brad’s being the top producers.  We are also hearing that herring, anise and sardine scents have been the most productive lately, but bringing multiple combinations of scent can pay off on certain days.  On the low slack and incoming tides, a lot of fishermen have been switching over to trolling 360° flashers, with small 3.5 size spinners or Brad’s Cut Plugs.  As you work your way up river, the outgoing tides do not run as hard and you will see fishermen trolling on both incoming and outgoing tides.  Again, the 360° flashers have been the biggest craze the last few years, but don't hesitate to stick on some traditional triangle shape flashers and troll with those.  Sometimes, the fish want to see something different, and that maybe what it takes.

    As you get into the Bonneville Dam section of the river, people will still be trolling.  The current runs all day long up there, and a traditional way of catching fish is to anchor or backtroll Kwikfish.  Most folks like to use sizes 15 and 16 Kwikfish, but Mag Lips, whether the 4.5 size or the larger Hawgnose, are a good choice too.  The larger plugs do well in the heavy currents that Bonneville Dam can provide.

    Astoria has also been very good for coho this week.  We had lots of reports of early limits and some really nice size coho in the mix.  Having both bait and spinners are a must down there, this time of year.  As a rule, the coho like to be higher in the water column so don't be afraid to run rods shallow, even as shallow as 15 feet on the line counter.  Anchovies and herring will both have their days, so again, it pays to have a good variety on hand down in Astoria.

    Tillamook has started to produce this last week as well.  Some very nice chinook have been caught along with some dandy coho.  Herring has been the big producer but as fish start to push into the upper bay, the spinner bite will definitely take off.

    General season archery elk has been going on in the coast range and our reports are that there have been some big bulls killed.  With this next week’s weather forecast showing some rain, things should only keep getting better.

    Be sure to check local regulations before heading out. Good luck and be safe.

    Sep 14, 2017 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report