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  • Outdoor Report 4/19

    Fisherman’s Oregon City employee Trevor LaValley headed to Eastern Oregon for some Brown Trout action. Fisherman’s Oregon City employee Trevor LaValley headed to Eastern Oregon for some Brown Trout action.

    Last week all the rain we had caused most of the local rivers to rise and turn muddy.  Even though the Willamette is high and off color, if you get a herring, anchovy or prawn spinner in front of a spring chinook he will eat it.  We had reports from the few boats that fished the Lower Willamette and there were spring chinook caught this week.  Most of the fish have come from the Portland Harbor, Multnomah Channel and Meldrum Bar.  When targeting these dirty water springers, fishing high in the water column is usually a good place to start.  Bright colored flashers, triangle or 360°, are usually a good bet with either herring, anchovies or prawns.  These fish are going to be slow-moving and waiting around for the water to clean up, so even if you don’t get a bite on your first or second pass, keep trolling as it can be hard to get your bait directly in front of an individual fish.  For those that don’t want to get out in the dirty water, it is a great time clean up your gear and stock up on bait and pre-tied leaders.  The more prepared you are, the more time you will spend actually fishing when on the water.

    A couple other fisheries to keep an eye on are the Wind River and Drano Lake fisheries.  A few days after we see a jump in fish passing over Bonneville Dam both fisheries will get going.  Normal trolling rigs with herring, prawns or anchovies work well here.  Another popular option is trolling a Mag Lip® or Kwikfish® behind a boat.  The fish will move into these fisheries and hang out for a decent amount of time before moving upriver so sometimes a spinner, Mag Lip® or Kwikfish® will entice the fish to bite.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing is still reliable. With a lot of quality fish being caught in the Portland Harbor area.  Squid, smelt and herring have all been popular choices this last week.

    Local trout lakes continue to get stocked and the fishing has been great for those that have been battling the rain.  PowerBait®, worms and salmon eggs have all been good options when fishing the bottom or with a bobber.  Another option is to cast Rooster Tails®, Kastmasters or small Blue Fox® spinners along shorelines.  Cruising trout love to eat hardware, especially early in the morning.  Check your local stocking schedules for up to date stocking info.

    This Saturday the 21st is the Long Beach Clam Festival and along with the festival are some minus tides and the last digs of the season for Washington’s Razor Clam beaches. See more info at the links:
    http://longbeachrazorclam
    festival.com/2018-event-schedule/
    https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing
    /shellfish/razorclams/current.html

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.

    Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Apr 20, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 4/12

    Fisherman's Pro Staff Guide, Craig Augustynovich, with a nice Southern Oregon gobbler. Fisherman's Pro Staff Guide, Craig Augustynovich, with a nice Southern Oregon gobbler.

    April 15th is the start of Oregon general Spring Turkey Season. The season runs through May 31 statewide. For more information go to http://www.eregulations.com
    /oregon/game-bird/game-bird-seasons/

    The Willamette River is super high and off color, with the turbidity being so high the salmon fishing has been brought to a stand still as we all wait patiently for things to come back into shape.  With that being the case, now is the perfect time to get all your gear in tip top shape, leaders pre-tied, gear cleaned, plugs washed and hooks sharpened, because once the Willamette clears up and drops, the fishing should be great.  In the Portland Harbor and Multnomah Channel most, anglers will be trolling herring, prawns, anchovies or spinners with either a triangle flasher or a 360° Flasher.  These fish will be eager to bite as they should be fresh out of the Columbia and headed to the Oregon City falls.  The Milwaukie area will be another great place to troll using the same method, prawns, herring, anchovies, spinners and Superbaits will all be great options there.  For those that want to fish Oregon City, the majority will be backtrolling eggs and sand shrimp or prawns.  Another great option is to fish smaller plugs such as Mag Lips®, K11 Kwikfish® and Wiggle Warts®.  Once the fish get into Oregon City they can, at times, become finicky biters so having a few different flavors of eggs or a variety of scents to find what they want can make or break the day.  Another newer technique is to vertically jig for these fish in the deeper water.  Using 2-4 ounce jigs and jigging them off the bottom can be a super fun way to fish.  Swing by one of our tackle departments and they can help square you away with the correct jigs.

    Another option when the rivers are blown out, is to go catch and release some sturgeon.  When the rivers are blown there are plenty of hungry sturgeon down in the Portland Harbor that need to be fed.  Squid, herring, smelt and sand shrimp are all great options when targeting sturgeon.  When the water is high and off color be mindful of what may come floating down river, you never know when a tree or root ball may show up.

    Trout fishing is another great choice for when the rivers are high and muddy.  Going to your local lake can be a fun change of pace as well as a fantastic opportunity to get your children or grandchildren out on the water.  Trolling small Flatfish®Mag Lips® or Wedding Rings® are all effective options.  When the sun comes out in the middle of the day, switching to fishing bait on the bottom may be your best option.  PowerBait®, nightcrawlers, salmon eggs or even cocktail shrimp are all good bait options.  Be sure to check your local stocking schedule to find out what’s been stocked the most recent.

    Once we get a break in the weather and the ocean will cooperate, the bottom fishing can be spectacular this time of year. Shrimp flies, curly tail grubs and jigs are all good options when targeting rock fish.  The lingcod and black bass fishing has been exceptional for those that have been able to get out recently.

    Another option at the coast right now is surf perch, these tasty fish are an awesome way to mix it up when you are on vacation at the coast or just wanting to try something different.  These fast swimming critters spend most of their time in the surf so they bite quickly and move fast.  Sharp hooks and the correct bait will keep you in the game when targeting these guys.  Sand shrimp, nightcrawlers and most of the Berkeley Gulp Saltwater products will work well for these fish.  Especially the Berkeley Gulp Sandworms.

    The Columbia River above Bonneville has been turning out some great Smallmouth Bass. Expect that when the Willamette River drops and clears, the smallies will be on the hunt as well.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.

    Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Apr 12, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 4/5

    Todd Woznick, fishing with FMO Pro Guide Josiah Darr, landed this beautiful hatchery Springer on the Columbia last Friday. Todd Woznick, while fishing with FMO Pro Guide Josiah Darr, landed this beautiful hatchery Springer on the Columbia last Friday.

    Winter steelhead fishing is on its last leg with many rivers beginning to see summer steelhead and spring chinook enter them.  However, there will still be some nice winter steelhead hanging around for the next week or two. This gives you the unique opportunity of targeting summer steelhead, winter steelhead and spring chinook all at once.  If you want a chance at hooking all three then back trolling plugs or diver and bait will be your best option.  Wiggle Warts®, K-11 Kwikfish®, Mag Lips®, Tadpollys or Hot Shots® are all good plug choices for tributary fishing right now.  Diver and shrimp is another good option or diver and eggs, especially if you know you have some chinook hanging around. Another good technique to use is to fish bobber and jig, which will work well for both summer and winter steelhead.

    On the Columbia and the Willamette, the spring chinook fishing has picked up with fish being caught in both systems.  On the Columbia many anglers are trolling herring or anchovies with triangle flashers right close to the bottom.  Long even flats are great places to look for when trolling as you have an excellent chance of encountering a spring chinook.  You will also be avoiding a lot of debris that typically builds up in areas where the bottom structure is constantly changing.  On the Willamette the Portland Harbor and Multnomah Channel are both starting to kick out fish as the water continues to clear after our last deluge of rain.  In both locations most people are fishing suspended, this allows you to cover a lot of water without constantly having to deal with tangles or being hung up on the bottom.  Most anglers are trolling herring, anchovies, prawns or smaller size trolling spinners in combination with either triangle or 360° Flashers.  The fishing can be good all throughout the day due to the river being a lot slower down there.  Which means you don’t necessarily have to be there at first light to get in on the action.  As we progress further into April the fishing will keep getting better the farther up the river you go with Oregon City becoming a popular option for a lot of anglers.  In Oregon City many people are back trolling divers and bait or plugs.  Diver and eggs is far and away the most widely used technique however, fishing prawns also works well, especially when the water temperatures start to rise later in the season.

    Local trout fishing is improving every week. As more fish get stocked and the water temperatures continue to rise it will get better and better.  Fishing PowerBait®, worms or salmon eggs are all great choices when fishing with either a bobber or on the bottom.  For those wanting to move around while they fish, casting small Blue Fox®, Mepps® or Rooster Tails® will all yield quality fish.  For those fishing out of a boat, trolling small Mag Lips®, Flatfish®, Wedding Rings® or flys are all good ideas.

    Bottom fishing remains great off much of the coast line.  Those fishing larger lead jigs or shrimp flys will have a great chance of catching virtually all species of bottom fish.  Be sure to check the local regulations before heading out, as some rules may vary at different locations.

    Kokanee fishing has also been productive lately.  The lower elevation lakes have been producing nice size Kokanee already and the higher mountain lakes will soon be thawed out and have willing Kokanee in them as well.  Most anglers have been catching their fish trolling with either Wedding Rings® or homemade trolling rigs made with hoochies, spinner blades or smile blades.  Anglers have been tipping these rigs with corn and trolling them on a short leader behind a dodger.  A lot of these fish are still high in the water column as the water temps have not started to rise very quickly.

    This week water temperatures in the Willamette above the Falls have been consistently hovering around 50 degrees which puts the smallmouth bass on the bite. It may cool a bit with the late week/weekend forecast for more rain, but expect good smallie fishing to continue to pick up as the river temperatures increase.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Apr 05, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 3/29

    Cole Braun, fishing with FMO Pro Guide Eric Baird, hoists a beautiful Columbia Springer.  Cole Braun, fishing with FMO Pro Guide Eric Baird,
    hoists a beautiful Columbia Springer.

    Winter steelhead fishing is slowly starting to wind down.  There are still fresh fish that will push up river although the end of March typically has people moving towards the big rivers to chase spring chinook.  For those that just can’t resist the pull of winter steelhead float fishing pink worms, jigs and beads will all yield great results.  Hardware is also an excellent option, especially if you want to cover a lot of water quickly.

    This last week spring chinook fishing has improved all up and down the Columbia.  We have had good reports from the Cathlamet area all the way up to Camas.  Most anglers have been trolling herring in combination with a flasher.  Many will fish green label herring cut-plug however, for those that like to fish a whole bait, red label herring is a good option for you.  Fish will start to be caught down in the Portland Harbor area and at the head of the Multnomah Channel as the Willamette continues to clear.  Trolling a flasher and herring will again be the most popular technique although a 360° flasher with a small spinner behind it is another great option.  Also, remember that in the harbor area most of the fish are suspended so it can be helpful to stagger your rod depths to dial in where the fish are at.

    Springtime trout fishing is underway and nearly all the local lakes have already been stocked this year, if not multiple times.  Some of the higher mountain lakes are still thawing out and will be getting stocked shortly.  Trolling with Wedding Rings®small spinner or smaller Flatfish® are all terrific options for springtime trout fishing. For those that are bank bound, fishing Powerbait®, nightcrawlers or single salmon eggs will be your best bet.

    Bottom fishing has been great, when the ocean has allowed anglers to get over the bar.  We have had reports of several boats getting limits of sea bass and a good portion of the fleet catching multiple lingcod as well.  Large curly tail grubs, shrimp flies and jigs have all been producing well.

    Walleye fishing has been consistent up the Columbia gorge.  We have reports of some great fishing for those that are willing to put in the time.  Trolling worm harnesses and bottom walkers have accounted for many of the fish.  There are a few anglers that still prefer jigging for walleye and they have also been doing well.

    Smallmouth bass fishing is in the early stages of the fish coming out of deep water.  These fish will bite if you get your presentation down deep enough to where they are. Using large, deep diving crankbaits and large profile plastics are probably your best options.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Mar 29, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Bucket List Sea Bass

    B.G. Eilertson, bg eilertson, Brooks Eilertson First dory trip out of Pacific City

    Being a life long Oregonian, I have been guilty of taking for granted all of the wonders this state possesses. As I have gotten older, I am realizing if you want to do something, you better prioritize and "get er done".
    In talking with a buddy of mine, we both realized neither of us have been on a dory fishing trip. Plans were made. We were spending the night in Pacific City and heading out for our first dory fishing trip with Johnny Harrell of Flyman Guide Service.

    We met Johnny and Jack at the Pacific City Fly Shop at 6:00 am and departed for the beach.
    It was a low tide series and while the only other dory guys at the launch site were waiting for a raising water level, Jack, clad in waders, started wading to check, the depth of a known sandbar. He helped Johnny chart the way out through the surf and helped get the bright yellow dory on the way.

    There had been high winds over the last few days, and because of that, some question as to how rough it was going to be in the ocean,
    We made it through the immediate surf pretty smoothly but hit some pretty good rollers as we rounded Cape Kwanda. We ran a few miles north and although the surface conditions were a bit "roiley" , quickly Johnny found his spot and we confirmed plenty of suspended sea bass.

    B.G. Eilertson, bg eilertson, Brooks Eilertson Randy with a nice fly rod caught Rockfish

    The gear we used, all provided by Johnny for our first foray and drift over the reef, were 9' 10 wgt fly rods matched with the Flyman brand of fly reel that Jack sources, loaded with 450 grain sinking head fly lines. The flies of choice were Clouser Minnows. It didn't take long before Randy was hooked up on a bass, then seconds later, I hooked up. It was pretty fast and furious fishing and, fortunately before we were to deep into our bag limit of bass, we noticed some surface activity, and made the decision to switch our gear to lighter rods with floating line and poppers. The poppers were pretty much your conventional large hard bodied bass poppers. Again it didn't take long to get action. In less than a minute I had a large bass cartwheel out of the water and crash down on my popper. Instinctively, I set the hook. Swing and a miss. Johnny instructed that most of these "hits" would be the bass slamming the popper to maim it and then come back, seconds later, to eat it. "Patience" he said. It took me at least 3 explosions to learn it. Randy and I made quick work of finishing off our limits.

    B.G. Eilertson, bg eilertson, Brooks Eilertson The Bass loved the poppers.

    After catching all of our bass we went to work on Ling Cod with conventional gear and jigs. Johnny has this fishery dialed as well and although we caught a number of lings, some were short of keeper size and had to go back. We were one short of our limit when Johnny said "reel email up. Time to pull the pots". He pointed out the wind whipped sea just a short distance from us and it was easy to see why we should probably make haste and get going.
    We pulled three crab pots and had no problem getting our 3 limits of crab.

    B.G. Eilertson, bg eilertson, Brooks Eilertson Nice haul of seafood!

    The mile and half ride back was sufficient proof that our captain had made the right call. The wind and waves were proving him right. The ride in, as was the launch and ride out, were well worth the price of admission. This was an awesome experience and one I hope to do again every year.

    B.G. Eilertson, bg eilertson, Brooks Eilertson Johnny and Jack provide a quality experience.

    Mar 29, 2018 | by B.G. Eilertson
  • Outdoor Report 3/22

    Daniela and Chris with an absolutely beautiful steelhead they caught aboard Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Josiah Darr’s drift boat. Daniela and Chris with an absolutely beautiful steelhead they caught aboard Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Josiah Darr’s drift boat.

    It is now that time of year, you can go spring chinook fishing or winter steelhead fishing and catch chrome fish wherever you go.  Fresh steelhead are still entering most of the north coast streams as well as the valley rivers.  The broodstock steelhead programs that are being run on multiple river systems have created a unique fishery where chrome bright hatchery winter steelhead are available for harvest all the way through the beginning of April.  This time of year can be very fun with a good mixture of hatchery and wild fish to keep you busy, accompanied by weather that, typically, is warmer than the last few months and longer days.

    Early spring steelhead fishing can be very productive.  Bobber and jig, pink worm or bait are great options for those wanting to float fish.  For the “old school” drift angler, bait, yarn, corkies, cheaters or spin-n-glos are all productive options to try.  Spoons and spinners are also fun techniques to use, with warming water temps the hardware bites can be vicious.

    Spring chinook fishing is getting better by the day on the Columbia and Willamette.  The Columbia has been the best from the woodland area down stream, with a large portion of the fish being caught trolling herring and a flasher.  The other portion of the fish are being caught by those that are anchor fishing plugs, prawn spinners or even herring.  As we progress towards April the airport area will start to produce good numbers of fish as well as the Camas to Beacon Rock section.  There are spring chinook being caught in the Portland Harbor area as well as the Multnomah Channel.  These fisheries are trolling dominant with most anglers fishing herring or prawns, although some people prefer to troll spinners and do quite well.  Most of these Willamette fish will be suspended up off the bottom, so trusting your electronics will help you dial in where the fish are that day.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been extremely good lately.  Lots of large shaker size and all the way up to small oversized sturgeon are in the mix.  If you’re looking for something to do with your extra herring after a morning of springer fishing, anchoring up and sturgeon fishing is a great way to spend an afternoon.  Herring, squid, sand shrimp and anchovies have all been producing well recently.

    Trout stocking has been underway for several weeks now and over 25 local lakes have been stocked in March alone.  Henry Hagg Lake has received over 16,000 trout this month with most being legal size, although they did also plant several hundred Trophy size trout.  Those fishing from a boat will do well trolling small flatfish, wedding rings or small spinners.  If you are going to be fishing from the bank use powerbait, worms or salmon eggs on the bottom as well as under a bobber.

    Smallmouth bass fishing is just getting started in the Columbia and Willamette.  The fish are still deep, so fishing extra deep diving crankbaits and soft plastics will be your best bet.  This is also a great time of year to target walleye in the Columbia and Willamette.  Most folks will be trolling worm harnesses with smile blades or small spinner blades to cover the most ground effectively.

    FMO employees that have headed west have had success fishing the ocean already this spring. The surf perch fishing is starting to warm up. The go to bait recently for the redtails, has been the Berkley Gulp Sandworms. Fish your bait of choice on 2 size 6 snelled hooks run dropper or drop shot style on your mainline above a 3 to 4 oz pyramid sinker. If you are looking for the right rod for this type of fishing, Fisherman’s has a good stock of the new Okuma Rockaway Surf Rods that were especially designed for this type of fishing. Those that are making it offshore are doing ok on the sea bass and very well on lingcod. Jigs, shrimp flies and large curly tail grubs have all been producing well. Remember that when you are bottom fishing from a boat you need to have a “descender” apparatus on board. Our most popular is the Shelton Fish Descender. This apparatus allows the safe release of any fish that you bring up from the depth and is now required to be used by ODFW.

    As always be sure to check local regulations before heading out.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all be safe out there.

    Mar 23, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 3/15

    Here's Marissa from our Oregon City store with an immaculate Tillamook Bay Spring Chinook caught a couple years back fishing with Chris Vertopoulos. Springers are now being caught daily from the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, and fishing will only improve in the coming weeks. Look for coastal rivers and bays to pick up in late April through June. Fish on! Here's Marissa from our Oregon City store with an immaculate Tillamook Bay Spring Chinook caught a couple years back fishing with Chris Vertopoulos. Springers are now being caught daily from the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, and fishing will only improve in the coming weeks. Look for coastal rivers and bays to pick up in late April through June. Fish on!

    Steelhead fishing has stayed consistent this last week. Anglers from the coast to the valley have been successful catching both hatchery and wild steelhead. Those that have been fishing out of a boat are finding their best results bobberdoggin’ or side drifting yarnies and eggs or beads, both soft and hard beads have been producing. Even so, do not underestimate the power of a properly backtrolled Mag Lip, Tadpolly or K11. Plugs are a great option as the water temps start to gradually warm and we see an occasional summer steelhead or spring chinook get caught. These fish will readily grab a plug, so it’s good to always have a rod or two rigged up for plug fishing.

    Those that are bank bound have been catching fish with a multitude of techniques. Float fishing jigs, worms or beads have been producing and drift fishing yarn, eggs, shrimp or plain corkies have been catching their fair share of fresh winter steelhead as well. Hardware can also be a killer option when there is a possibility of hooking a summer steelhead or spring chinook. These fish will willing grab a spinner or spoon, not to mention these techniques can be some of the most fun to deploy. Blue Fox, Mepps, Little Cleo and P-Line Pro Steel spoons are among many of the great options when choosing hardware. Like we already mentioned, look for a few summer steelhead and spring chinook to get caught as the month progresses.

    Spring chinook are now being caught daily in the Columbia and lower Willamette. The numbers are nowhere near amazing but those putting in the time are having success. Trolling plug cut herring behind your favorite triangle flasher has been the most widely used technique so far. However, those that are choosing to anchor have just as good of a chance, these early springers are usually quite aggressive. Whole red label or cut-plug green label are the preferred size baits when targeting spring chinook. Pair that with a triangle flasher from either Yakima Bait, Shortbus or Gibbs Tackle and you will have a winning combo.

    It’s also that time of year when bass and panfish are beginning to stir. Mealworms, nightcrawlers or jigs tipped with Crappie Nibbles are great options for catching perch, bluegill and crappie. Slow presentations of plastic baits will fool large and smallmouth bass as they emerge from their winter lethargy. Slow-rolling a spinnerbait around cover is also a great bass technique this time of year and can result in some of the biggest fish of the season!

    Spring trout stocking has commenced at many lowland lakes and ponds, with Henry Hagg Lake alone receiving thousands of catchable trout thus far, and hundreds of huge trophy trout to boot! For a list of recently stocked waters, check out the ODFW home page at myodfw.com.

    Catch-and-release sturgeon fishing in the Willamette River remains excellent, with fish hitting a variety of baits this time of year. Squid, smelt, herring, and sand shrimp should all attract attention.

    We have now reached the point on the calendar where a wide variety of angling opportunities become available to the Northwest angler. So good luck deciding which way to point the truck or boat, and have fun getting your fish on!

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Mar 15, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 3/8

    Jeff Owens and Troy Wolf were able to catch their chrome limits with the help of Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Terry Mulkey Jeff Owens and Troy Wolf were able to catch their chrome limits with the help of Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Terry Mulkey

    Steelhead fishing has been very consistent throughout the last week. There seems to be a decent number of fish throughout the system, both locally and at the coast.  So, if you are wanting to take your drift boat down to the lower stretches to do some bobberdoggin’ or side drifting you have a great shot at tagging a couple of fish.  If you are wanting to bank fish the upper stretches and float fish, drift fish or throw hardware you have an equally good opportunity at finding steelhead.

    With water being in good condition anglers looking to float fish will do well with pink worms, BnR Steelhead Scampi, soft beads, jigs and/or bait.  Anglers wanting to drift fish can use corkies, cheaters, yarn, pink worms or bait, these will yield chrome results when put in front of a hungry steelhead.  This is also a time of year that we tend to see a larger grade of fish as there are lots of wild steelhead around.  Always keep in mind that the next one you hook may be the fish of a lifetime.

    Spring chinook have been caught these last couple of weeks and the fishing will continue to get better and better as the month progresses.  Trolling herring in combination with a triangle flasher or 360° flashers are both super popular options.  Prawn spinners, Kwikfish and Brad’s Cut Plugs or Superbaits will all be good options to have on board.  Those that are anchor fishing will do best with Kwikfish, Flatfish and Mag Lips.  Don’t forget to try a prawn spinner, it’s not a technique that is widely used but can be extremely productive.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been phenomenal.  This time of year, sturgeon fishing can be a great backup plan if the spring chinook fishing is a little slow that day.  Smelt, herring and sand shrimp are all excellent options when targeting these prehistoric creatures.
    Lots of anglers over the last couple of years have been turning their attention to Walleye and Kokanee. This weekend should see both an increase in participation and catch. Target the Walleye in the Bonneville Pool of the Columbia River and the closest Kokanee fishery to our stores will be Merwin Reservoir in Southwest Washington.

    As always make sure you check the local regulations before heading out.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Mar 09, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 3/1

    Recently caught steelhead taken bobberdoggin with Fisherman’s Pro Guide David Johnson Recently caught steelhead taken bobberdoggin' with Fisherman’s Pro Guide David Johnson

    It has been cold, last week’s snow caused the rivers to drop a few degrees and slowed down the fish migration a little, which is not a bad thing. When we get cold temperatures that make the fish slow their travel upriver it means they spend more time in certain spots, allowing you more time to get at them. You may need to bring along some bait to get them to snap, or try a few different techniques however, there are plenty of fish around and they are willing to bite.

    There was a good shot of fish in most of the coastal streams as the snow melted and the rivers came up some. A lot of folks that have been doing well are focusing their efforts on the lower stretches of the rivers either bobberdoggin’ or side drifting with yarn, bait, beads or worms. These fish are typically ocean fresh and eager biters. There will be fresh hatchery steelhead to catch all the way through March thanks to the broodstock programs that are being run on most of the north coast and valley rivers. This gives everyone something to fish for as we wait for the first big push of springers to come into the Columbia and Willamette.

    We are still getting a few reports of springers being caught each week. They are still few and far between but that could change daily as we head into March. March is typically the kickoff month for springer anglers and it only gets better as we head into April. Some of the first fish will be caught trolling herring and a flasher, this technique allows you to cover a lot of water. There will also be fish caught by anchor anglers who are sitting on the hook with Kwikfish, Mag Lips or Flatfish wrapped in their favorite bait fish. Finding a cut off or choke point will be the best option when anchoring.

    March is the time that trout stocking starts to ramp up. Area anglers can find a lot of success on local Henry Hagg Lake. There is always something to fish for there. Besides frequent trout stocking of legal size and larger rainbow trout, there are huge smallmouth bass that start to “turn on” as early as March. Other popular area lakes to find good trout populations this time of year are, on the east side; Benson, Hartman and Blue Lakes just east of Troutdale off of I-84. Mt Hood Pond, just east of Gresham. Canby Pond is located right in Canby Park and is a great place to take kids as you must be 17 years old or younger to fish it. On the west side of Portland, you will find Bethany Pond and Commonwealth Lake both close to Hwy 26 near Beaverton. Also near the Beaverton, Sherwood area is Progress Lake. These lakes and ponds, plus many others in the Willamette Valley and along the coast are well stocked this time of year. For more information, directions and stocking schedule you can go to https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/willamette-zone. The early season methods that are most popular will be worms and Berkley Powerbait Dough or Gulp eggs either on the bottom or suspended under a bobber or float. For those who like to cast lures, popular spinners are Yakima Bait Roostertails and Panther Martin Spinners.

    In Washington, Clark County’s Klineline Pond and Battleground Lake were stocked earlier this week and those fish should be snapping by this weekend. You can find out more info going to bit.ly/2GXrUqh

    Razor clams are open at Mocrocks beach Friday and Saturday for evening tides. Check WDFW’s site for more these digs and others coming mid-month. https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/
    shellfish/razorclams/
    current.html

    Mar 01, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 2/22

    Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Eric Baird showing off an early Willamette River Springer he caught this week. Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Eric Baird showing off an early Willamette River Springer he caught this week.

    Winter steelhead fishing has been productive from the coast to the valley, with most of the rivers having a good mix of hatchery and wild steelhead.  At the coast a lot of the rivers have dropped to the point of becoming low and clear.  This doesn’t mean the fish stop entering the river, it just means that you need to change your technique slightly.  Most of the valley rivers started to get clear as well and many anglers changed their techniques to suit the conditions.

    Float fishing becomes one of the most predominant techniques as you can be stealthy and get your presentation to whatever depth you want.  Beads, jigs and bait are just a few of the options that work well under clear conditions.  However, with this week’s snow and forecasted rain, things will change once again. The rivers are predicted to get back to that steelhead green color and it will become a dealer’s choice.  Drift fishing, side drifting, bobberdoggin’, float fishing and casting hardware will all be viable options.  This is also the time of year that we start to see an influx of bigger wild steelhead, so always keep that in the back of your mind, your next bite could be that infamous 20 lb. steelhead.

    There have been spring chinook caught this last week and it will only continue to get better as time progresses.  Trolling herring and a flasher will be the most widely used technique, especially in the Portland harbor area, farther up the Willamette people switch to prawns or eggs.  In the Columbia a lot of the early fish are caught either on anchor with plugs or by trolling a flasher and herring.  If you use an anchor, focus on choke points that will funnel fish right to your plugs.  If you prefer trolling you will do well finding flats that have consistent depths or choke points that don’t have anchored boats already taking up the real estate.

    The two-rod endorsement for the Clackamas and lower Willamette has been approved again this season. It begins March 1st and lasts through August 15th.  It is legal for all species except Sturgeon.

    Kokanee reports are coming in and people are doing well already this spring. This time of year, “flat lining” is the way to go as the kokanee are usually found shallow until water temperatures rise later in the spring. Flashers and hoochies are continuing to grow in popularity although the seasoned angler who is fishing lake trolls and wedding rings will still pile the fish in the boat. Of course, any lure used for kokanee is far more effective when tipped with Green Giant Shoepeg Corn and Berkley Gulp Maggots.

    Offshore fishing for rockfish and lingcod has been seeing increased effort and, when the ocean conditions are good, there have been good reports coming in.

    Surf perch anglers are getting anxious to get out, weather and tides permitting.  Although surf perch are available year-round, this growing fishery is typically best in the spring.

    As always make sure you check the local regulations before heading out.

    Tight lines, shoot straight and most of all, be safe out there.

    Feb 22, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report