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  • Outdoor Report 11/28

    Thanksgiving is the traditional kickoff to Winter Steelhead season in the incredible Pacific Northwest. Will this be the year that you reach the coveted 20-lb benchmark? Visit the Tackle Department of any of our three stores for tips, techniques and gear, and we’ll be happy to help you reach that goal. Fish on! Thanksgiving is the traditional kickoff to Winter Steelhead season in the incredible Pacific Northwest. Will this be the year that you reach the coveted 20-lb benchmark? Visit the Tackle Department of any of our three stores for tips, techniques and gear, and we’ll be happy to help you reach that goal. Fish on!

    This past week we had a little bit of rain and then the start of a large cold front that has come in and is dropping river temperatures and river heights.  These conditions can make fishing tough if you are not prepared for them.  However, having a game plan can really help increase your odds.  Most rivers have chinook, coho and a few early winter steelhead in them so you never know what you may hook!  Small baits of eggs, jigs or beads are all stealthy presentations that can be utilized in low water conditions.  Lighter leader can definitely help and using fluorocarbon can be a game changer.  Spinners and spoons will work well with the colder water temps, sometimes fish need an invasive presentation to “wake them up”.  Try to focus your efforts on "walking speed" water where fish can get a reprieve from the current, since water temps have gotten cold.

    Along the coast crabbing has continued to be good with crabbers reporting hefty keepers coming out of Tillamook and Nehalem bays.  The lack of rain helps crabbing as we have less fresh water entering the bay which is actually more inviting for the crab.

    Razor clamming has been very good from Seaside up through Long Beach.  WDFW has set their most recent season for November 24th through November 30th, and folks that have been heading to Long Beach are finding quick limits of tasty razor clams.

    Fishing along the jetties has also been productive for anglers.  Greenling, lingcod, seabass and a variety of perch all inhabit the many jetties along the coast.  Fishing sand shrimp off the bottom can be one of the most productive ways to catch perch and greenling, while fishing white curly tail grubs is a crowd favorite for lingcod and seabass.  Don’t forget to bring along a few Danielson folding crab traps and cast out a few crab rods as well.  It can be a super fun and productive way to add crab to the dinner menu!

    Trout fishing is an option all around the region and trout will still be active even through these cold spells.  Fishing bait is always a great option as trout will definitely need to feed through these colder time periods. Spoons, spinners and plugs will all work, at times as, trout may need a reaction type bait to snap them into biting.  Larger bodies of water are a good place to spend your time, such as Hagg Lake.  These lakes take longer to cool down and also get heavily stocked throughout the year. Most rivers and streams are closed to trout fishing at this time, so focus your attention on lower elevation lakes and ponds, when in doubt check the regulations for the water you intend to fish.

    Kokanee fishing is often an overlooked fishery this time of year.  Locally, Merwin lake has been kicking out some very nice quality fish and in good numbers too!  Colder temps bring the fish closer to the surface which makes it easier for folks that aren’t using downriggers to target these delicious fish.  Fishing your favorite dodger with either a small spin-n-glo, wiggle hootchie, wedding ring or small spinner behind it will all produce strikes.  Of course, tipping your baits with shoepeg corn is a must and having several scent options on board will definitely tip the odds in your favor.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been quite good in the Portland Harbor area of the Willamette, with lots of quality fish being caught.  Bring a boat full of food, a nice heater and some good bait and you are set for a fun day on the water.  Squid, smelt, sand shrimp and herring have all been productive lately.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 29, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/21

    With Thanksgiving as the traditional start to Winter Steelhead season here in the awesome Pacific Northwest, the fish should start showing up any day now. Will you be ready to do battle with a bruiser like this phenomenal brood stock Steelhead caught last season by customer Ron Laughlin while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide Ted Teufel? With Thanksgiving as the traditional start to Winter Steelhead season here in the awesome Pacific Northwest, the fish should start showing up any day now. Will you be ready to do battle with a bruiser like this phenomenal brood stock Steelhead caught last season by customer Ron Laughlin while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide Ted Teufel?

    Coastal Fall Chinook is still a viable option, and with the lack of rain, we may be in for a great late Chinook fishery this year.  These hard-fighting salmon are staging in bays and in the ocean, still waiting on the rain we have been desperately needing.  There are still fish being caught in these areas and we should get one more solid push of fish once we get the rain.  There will definitely still be a mixture of late Coho mixed in with them, so don’t be surprised if you hook a few of those acrobatic salmon as well.  In the bay, trolling herring with lead or 360° flashers with small spinners have been the go-to techniques, while in the rivers it’s a little different game.  Pulling KwikfishFlatfish or Mag Lips is a great option, as is bobber fishing eggs and shrimp.  Both techniques have stood the test of time and are still very good choices when chasing these fish in the river.

    B-Run coho are still flushing into Southwest Washington rivers and will continue for a few more weeks. Twitching jigs, Wiggle Warts, Brad’s Wigglers and Blue Fox spinners are all perfect choices when searching for these chrome Coho.  Once you find them, if they stop biting those techniques, switching over to fishing eggs under a bobber or drift fishing bait are good tactics to scratch a few more fish.

    Don’t be surprised if you hook a Steelhead while chasing Coho or Chinook this time of year.  These fish all tend to sit in similar places and sometime a brand new Winter Steelhead just can’t resist the wiggle of a K15 Kwikfish or a Summer Steelhead can’t hold back when it sees a Blue Fox spinners come flying in front of it.  These Steelhead can be super aggressive so always be ready for the possibility of a November Winter Steelhead.

    Bottom fishing all along the coast continues to be productive with anglers reporting great success targeting lingcod.  The fishing has been fast and furious for some anglers so don’t be surprised if you end up catching your limit early.  That’s another great reason to bring along some crab pots to soak while you are headed out to the bottom fish grounds.  Sometimes all it takes is one drop with a few pots and you have your crab limit as well as your bottom fish limit.

    Jetty fishing this time of the year can be quite good and with the mild weather we’ve been having the jetty has been a fun place to be.  Anglers have reported success catching Rockfish, Greenling and various types of Perch, with an occasional lingcod mixed in.  Most anglers will fish with a lead head jig and a medium size curly tail grub in either white, green or root beer colors.  Another great technique to try is to fish sand shrimp off the bottom.  Try and get your gear to rest on the sandy bottom where the rocks meet the sand.  Once you find the sweet spot, the action can be fast paced.  Crabbing is also a great option off a jetty.  All you need is a heavy-duty spinning rod and a couple of Crab Hawk folding crab traps and you are in business.  You can cast out the crab rods, let them sit, and catch fish while you are waiting.  It’s a great way to spend a day at the coast.

    Fall Trout fishing can be a real treat, especially when we have a nice break in the weather.  Locally, Henry Hagg Lake is a great option as it was heavily stocked this year and the Trout are feeding heavily for the cold winter months.  Bait is always a great option, especially for those that are bank fishing.  For those that have a boat, trolling is a great option.  Small Flatfish, Mag Lips or wedding rings are all great options as well as casting spinners or spoons along shorelines.

    Razor clamming last week was phenomenal with the low tides that we had.  Look for WDFW to set more dates for Long Beach razor clamming.  Oregon allows razor clamming every day and therefore you always have an option for razor clams when the tides get low enough.  Focus your efforts from Seaside north.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 22, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/14

    Winter Steelhead will begin to show soon, and many die-hard Steelhead anglers are taking advantage of the pre-season to tie rigs, prepare gear and otherwise get ready for the arrival of one of the world’s premier Sport Fish! Check out our killer selection of Steelhead gear at Fisherman’s, your Winter Steelheading Headquarters! Winter Steelhead will begin to show soon, and many die-hard Steelhead anglers are taking advantage of the pre-season to tie rigs, prepare gear and otherwise get ready for the arrival of one of the world’s premier Sport Fish! Check out our killer selection of Steelhead gear at Fisherman’s, your Winter Steelheading Headquarters!

     

    Along the coast the Fall Chinook fishing continues to go well.  The lack of rain has kept the bays and bubble fisheries going later and better than usual.  These fisheries are dominated by trolling fishermen and a good portion of the fleet is using 360° flashers with small spinners.  However, the closer to the jaws that you get, you will start to see more people trolling lead and cut-plug herring.  The fish that they are catching there are still feeding and having good quality bait will pay dividends.  Farther up the bay you will see folks trolling in shallower water with just a small lead and spinner.  These folks are targeting fish that are staging, waiting for the rain to draw them into their respective tributary.

    Tributary Coho fishing continues, and this next batch of rain will surely bring in more fresh fish.  Specifically, in southwest Washington where rivers get a B run of Coho, the fishing will get better as the month progresses.  Twitching jigs, wiggle warts, 3.5 Mag Lips, spinners, spoons and eggs are all great choices when looking for these acrobatic fish.  With late run Coho, when you find one you can typically expect to find quite a few of them.  If you can stay on the school of biters, then you can sometimes get the boat limit before breakfast!

    Bottom fishing has been very consistent this past week with good ocean conditions and plenty of willing biters.  There has been a nice mix of Lingcod and Rockfish with a few of the Lingcod being way above average size.  Vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs have been working well for a lot of fishermen while there are other folks that have been finding success with P-Line Rock Cod Rigs and Shrimp Flies.

    Crabbing continues to be killer as the lack of rain has made for stellar crabbing in most local bays.  Big, healthy crab have been filling pots in Tillamook and at Nehalem bay.  Make sure you watch the tides though, as we have had large swings which can cause some fishermen to lose crab pots if placed in the wrong location.

    This time of year fishing off of a jetty can be so much fun!  Bring a rod to throw out some folding crab traps and while they soak try your hand at fishing for Rockfish, Perch and Lingcod.  At times, the fishing can be off the charts good!  Couple that with half a dozen keeper crab and you have yourself a feast!  White curly tail grubs work very well for the Rockfish or Lingcod and sand shrimp are a great choice when trying to catch Greenling or Perch.

    Trout fishing is a great option this time of year as most all lakes have been stocked already and a lot of angling attention gets shifted towards Salmon, thus creating great opportunities with less pressure than in the spring or summer.  Trout are getting fatter by the day and with less angling pressure they become increasingly aggressive.  Spinners, Kastmasters, jigs, flies and plugs have all been working well.

    Clamming is another option for those looking to get the family outdoors for a day and having a good chance at taking home dinner!  Bay clamming is a great way to get the younger generations outside as you can give them a shovel and let them dig their little hearts out.  They will be able to see rewards for their efforts and it will get them excited for their next adventure.

    Razor clamming has been stellar at Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Copalis this past week.  Fast limits were the norm for most folks.  Be on the lookout for the next Razor Clam opener from WDFW.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 15, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/7

    Watch those teeth! Chum Salmon are currently on tap in our region and are tackle-busting brawlers!  Watch those teeth! Chum Salmon are currently on tap in our region and are tackle-busting brawlers!

    All along the Oregon Coastline fall Chinook fishing continues to be productive.  With the lack of rain a lot of the fish are staying out in the bay or even in the bubble fisheries right outside the mouths of the bays.  These fish are more or less milling around, just waiting on rain.  Fishermen have been finding good success trolling 360° flashers with small spinners as well as with lead and a cut-plug herring.  Near the mouths of the tributaries, some folks have been finding success with bobber and eggs, targeting the fish that are staged near those areas.  This can be very tidally dependent so make sure you have some trolling gear with you if the egg bite isn’t happening. We can expect at least one more decent push of fish into rivers, just need rain at this point.

    Below Bonneville Dam, fishing for hatchery coho is still open and those that are putting their time in are being rewarded.  These fish are stacking up around the mouths of their respective tributaries waiting on rain and are fairly easy to target.  Trolling spinners, Wiggle Warts, Mag Lips and 360° flashers with spinners have all been producing fish. Recently there has been an innovative coho fishery developing on the Columbia mainstem & tributary mouths where anglers are using twitching rigs to target coho-cool stuff!

    In Southwest Washington there are a number of rivers that get two runs of coho and the second run, B run, are starting to trickle in.  These fish will filter into these tributaries now through the beginning of December and are typically very good biters.  Twitching jigs, spinners, plugs and spoons are all great techniques to choose from when chasing these aggressive fish.

    Bottom fishing has stayed good with anglers reporting great success this last week as the ocean finally calmed down and made crossing the bar much easier.  The catch has been a good mixture of Lingcod and rock fish with anglers also taking advantage of the ability to drop crab pots to add to the bounty.  Crabbing will stay good with crabs continuing to fill out and as salmon fishing slows, the amount of people dropping pots will also decrease.  Giving you even more opportunity to limit the boat.

    There are evening Razor Clam tides starting Monday of next week and Washington has approved the following season:
    •             Nov. 11, Monday, 5:51 pm, 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

    •             Nov. 12, Tuesday, 6:27 pm, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

    •             Nov. 13, Wednesday, 7:03 pm, -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

    •             Nov. 14, Thursday, 7:41 pm, -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

    •             Nov. 15, Friday, 8:22 pm, -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

    •             Nov. 16, Saturday, 9:08 pm, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

    •             Nov. 17, Sunday, 9:59 pm, -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

    Please note-No digging is allowed before noon for allowed digs, when low tide occurs in the evening

    For more information on razor clam seasons in Washington visit https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing

    In Oregon the season is open for the beaches between the Columbia river and the North Jetty of the Siuslaw River. The go to area is Clatsop Spit. Look for good tides in the evenings and you should find razors around Seaside, Gearhart, and the Fort Stevens areas. For more information visit https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/

    Trout fishing around the local area has stayed a good option and the amazing weather we have been having has kept the trout very active.  These feisty fish offer a great way to get the whole family into the outdoors as the action can be constant and an easy way to keep young or new anglers entertained.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been quite good, especially in the Portland harbor area of the Willamette River.  These fish have started to pile into the Willamette and have been keying in on sand/shrimp, smelt and squid.

    November also means Chum Salmon on Oregon's North Coast and Southwest Washington Rivers. At times very aggressive, Chum can also be very finicky when rivers are low and clear. Flies, jigs and drift gear in pink or chartreuse are standard fare. Always check regulations for chum on the river you intend to fish. Fish on!
    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 08, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/31

    Fisherman’s Pro Staffer, Eric Baird, took a day off from guiding to fish with friends and caught this gorgeous, chrome Chinook while bobber-fishing eggs on a North Coast river. (Eric Baird and Play ‘N’ Hooky Guide Service: 503-504-1822.) Fisherman’s Pro Staffer, Eric Baird, took a day off from guiding to fish with friends and caught this gorgeous, chrome Chinook while bobber-fishing eggs on a North Coast river. (Eric Baird and Play ‘N’ Hooky Guide Service: 503-504-1822.)

    There was some decent salmon fishing on coastal rivers after the last rise in water we had, but rivers are again low and clear. Fish were caught back-bouncing roe, back-trolling sardine-wrapped plugs, bobber-fishing eggs and even some while old-school drift-fishing. We need more rain to draw another batch of fresh fish into rivers, and there should be another good push of both Coho and Chinook on the next rise. If river fishing is your favored venue, salmon are still available in deeper holes if you scale down your gear, offer smaller baits and concentrate on the heavy water at the head of the hole.

    Lower river levels mean that salmon will continue to stage in bays and tidewater awaiting the next freshet. In the bays, anglers are mostly trolling small spinners like Simon and VIP 3.5’s behind Pro Trolls, or other similar 360° flashers. Believe it or not, good old plain herring has also been catching fish! Fishermen have also been trolling in the tidewater reaches of rivers where possible, and bobber fishing eggs and sand shrimp is also a solid tactic for targeting fish here. Casting spinners in tidewater is also a sometimes effective way to wake up lethargic fish that aren’t responding to bait. A #5 Blue Fox Vibrax in chartreuse, copper or blue can be deadly for this at times.

    There are still some Coho available in local streams, but it looks like we are past the peak of the run in the Sandy and Clackamas. Look elsewhere for later B-run fish; some Southwest and coastal Washington streams have later runs of Coho. Float-fishing eggs, casting spinners or plugs and twitching jigs are all productive at times.

    Chum salmon have begun to trickle into their usual locations, but we’ll need more rain to draw in the herd. Be sure to check the regulations when targeting Chum, for they are catch-and-release only in many locations, and aren’t very good to eat once in rivers anyway. The cerise-colored Steelhead Scampi from local company, BnR Tackle, is absolutely killer for Chum wherever they are found. Fish it on a ¼-ounce jig head under a float and hang on! A minimum of twenty-pound gear is recommended for Chum as they are brutal fighters with pronounced teeth! The farther north you travel, the more prolific the runs become.  Known as reckless biters when conditions are good, they can also be finicky when rivers are low and clear. In this situation, tipping your offering with cocktail shrimp or prawn meat can make all the difference. They are also suckers for drift gear and jigs in pink and chartreuse, and they will sometimes destroy your favorite Chinook plugs!

    Sturgeon fishing can be hit-and-miss this time of year, but if you keep on the move you can often locate willing biters. Having several different options for bait on board can also be critical for success. Herring, smelt, anchovy, and sand shrimp can all work at times, and even night crawlers can produce, especially on the Willamette River.

    Trout fishing can still be excellent this time of year, especially at low-elevation lakes that really shine as water temperatures continue to drop. Henry Hagg Lake near Forest Grove can be particularly productive as it continues to receive a large number of planted fish, with over 8,000 legal and trophy trout recently stocked there. In the cooler water of Fall, fishing bait becomes effective once again, and trolling or casting your favorite trout lures can also be deadly. When heading out trout fishing this time of year, be sure to check regulations for the water you intend to fish as many trout waters—including most rivers—close to trout fishing on October 31st.

    Crabbing has been great when the weather allows. Use up to three pots or rings per person to maximize your haul; limit 12 male crab per person on Dungeness. Type of bait can also be important, so it often pays to try different options to see what these tasty critters prefer on any given day. Please be safe when crabbing or fishing on our bays or ocean this time of year and keep a sharp eye on the weather!

    Razor clamming on Oregon Beaches is open and can be great on a good tide set. Most clammers focus on beaches north of Tillamook Head as populations there are more robust. Bay clams can be taken all along our Coast or Bays, and this is a great way to get the whole family involved in an outdoor activity in the awesome Pacific Northwest! Dress warm and take along a change of clothes as clamming can be a messy business! Minus tides provide the best access to these critters. Before heading out, it is advisable to call the Oregon Shellfish Hotline for any updates or closures: 1-800-448-2474.

     

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 01, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/24

    Fall Chinook fishing is in full swing. Kimberly and Madisen Shervey caught these beautiful bucks while fishing with Pro Staffer Silas Stardance at the coast. Fall Chinook fishing is in full swing. Kimberly and Madisen Shervey caught these beautiful bucks while fishing with Pro Staffer Silas Stardance at the coast.

    With the heavy rain last week, the rivers were on the rise, and fish were on the move!  Both in the valley and all along the coast rivers jumped up dramatically and the fish started their journey into the rivers and tributaries.  With the warm dry weather this week the coastal rivers will be dropping again.  Tillamook and Nehalem Bay have both been fishing well with a nice grade of fish being caught.  Most fishermen are either trolling 360° flashers with small 3.5 size spinners or lead and a cut plug herring.  These fish move around in the bay depending on the tide so make sure you check your tide charts before planning your day on the water.

    The Columbia re-opened for coho this last week and the anglers that braved the temperamental weather over the weekend were rewarded.  Fish were caught on small plugs such as wiggle warts and 3.5 Mag Lips.  Fish were caught with 360° flashers and small spinners or Brad’s Super Cut Plugs.  Fish were also caught hover fishing eggs near the mouths of tributaries that feed the Columbia.  Again, this week’s weather looks great throughout the region so the fishing should stay good for a while.

    Tributary coho fishing has continued to improve with a lot of rivers seeing a very good push of fish off the last shot of rain.  There is starting to be a good mix of A run and B run coho as well as chinook in most rivers so you never know what you might hook!  Twitching jigs, spinners, plugs and eggs are all reliable techniques when it comes to targeting these feisty fish.

    Sturgeon fishing has been good with anglers reporting some of the best success near the mouth of the Willamette and down river from there.  These fish are taking advantage of the lower flows and feeding heavily before the water gets colder and they become a bit more lethargic.  Squid, sandshrimp and smelt have been the top producing baits lately.

    Locally trout fishing continues to be a great option.  These fish are getting quite active and are in the feeding mood.  Stocking up for winter is on their minds so a lot of the time they will attack well-presented baits and lures as if it was their last meal.  Lakes have continued to be stocked around the state, however one of the biggest plants in the Portland metro area was at Hagg Lake with 8,500 legal and trophy trout.  Trolling is a great way to target this fish as well as casting spinners.  If you are bank bound than casting spinners or spoons also works great, as well as bobber and bait or fishing bait off of the bottom.

    Crabbing has stayed good and they are getting fuller by the week.  We have had reports of great crabbing from both Nehalem and Tillamook bay as well as Astoria.  Bring as many pots as you legally can, and quick limits are in your future.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 25, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/17

    Gloria from our Oregon City store recently teamed up with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Terry Mulkey, to catch this awesome Tillamook Bay Chinook! Most anglers are reporting better catch rates from coastal bays and rivers thus far this year. Our current pattern of rain is drawing more fish into rivers and should make for some good salmon fishing ahead! (Mulkey’s Guide Service: 503-803-1896.) Gloria from our Oregon City store recently teamed up with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Terry Mulkey, to catch this awesome Tillamook Bay Chinook! Most anglers are reporting better catch rates from coastal bays and rivers thus far this year. Our current pattern of rain is drawing more fish into rivers and should make for some good salmon fishing ahead! (Mulkey’s Guide Service: 503-803-1896.)

    Salmon fishing all along the coast is really starting to heat up.  From Nehalem Bay all the way to the Sacramento River, salmon fishing is getting good.  Most folks have been targeting fish either in the bays or just outside the mouth of the bay as these fish are staging for migration.  Fishermen have been spending most of their time trolling bait or spinners.  They have been trolling both triangle flashers and 360° flashers, switching back and forth depending on the tide and the amount of weeds.  Cut-plug herring are the #1 choice when it comes to running bait. The spinner fishermen are split down the middle, with folks still trolling larger blades-up to a size 8-and others trolling smaller 3-4 size spinners.  Either way, fish are being caught and the coming rains will only increase the catch rates.

    Coho fishing has also continued to be good with local tributaries seeing the peak of their season right now.  Rivers that have two runs of coho, A and B runs, are just starting to see the first signs of the larger B run coho.  These fish are typically bigger and come with a bigger attitude.  They like to bite spinners, spoons, plugs and twitching jigs.  With local waters really beginning to cool off, these fish will come into the system aggressive and ready to bite.

    Sturgeon fishing has also continued to be good.  Although this is a catch and release fishery, it is still a great way to get young or new anglers into the sport. If you try a spot and have no success, then pick-up and move, as this can be key in finding willing biters.

    Trout fishing can be amazing this time of year with fish that have been playing hard to get all summer now coming alive and trying to pack on the weight for the cold winter months.  These aggressive fish can be a bit bigger than the freshly-stocked legal trout.  Flies, spinners, spoons and plugs all work well.  An underrated technique is to twitch small jigs for trout just like you would for coho.  This type of reaction bait can be the ticket when trying to connect with large trout.  Mt.  Hood Pond and Canby Pond both were stocked this week and are great places to take young anglers.  Also, Henry Hagg Lake is set to receive almost 9,000 trout next week!

    Crabbing continues to be great and will get better as each week passes.  Whether in the bay or in the ocean you have a great chance at a limit of crab.

    Bottom fishing all along the north coast has been very productive when ocean conditions allow, which has not been the case this week.  The unpredictable weather can make crossing the bar a bit tricky this time of the year, if not downright impossible. Check the forecast before you go and you may be in for a treat with great fishing and a good grade of fish being caught lately.  Shrimp flies, Rock Cod rigs and vertical jigs have all been working well.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 18, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/10

    Mike Kostel caught and released this rowdy Deschutes River steelhead this past Monday while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Pete Field. Steelhead anglers on the Deschutes are currently seeing some of the best action of the season, with fish being caught on flies, bobber and jig, spinners and plugs. (Pete Field Guide Service: 503-539-0587.) Mike Kostel caught and released this rowdy Deschutes River steelhead this past Monday while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Pete Field. Steelhead anglers on the Deschutes are currently seeing some of the best action of the season, with fish being caught on flies, bobber and jig, spinners and plugs. (Pete Field Guide Service: 503-539-0587.)

    Fall chinook fishing has been decent this past week along the Oregon Coast , with reports coming in from most all of the bays and estuaries south of Astoria.  The fish seem to be in transition from hanging out in the ocean to entering into the bay that their tributaries feed into.  The next decent rain we get will likely bring in a good wave of fish that can be targeted from the bay through the tidewater sections of most major rivers.  So far, fish have been caught trolling triangle flashers with herring, triangle flashers with spinners, 360° flashers with small spinners and folks fishing bobber and eggs farther up bays and into tidewater.  Once we get some really significant rain to bring river levels up, the drift boat fisheries will start to kick in and more opportunities will open up.  Back trolling Kwikfish or Mag Lips will be an awesome technique when trying to find these high water Kings.  Back-bouncing and bobber fishing eggs and shrimp will also be a widely used technique.

    Tributary coho fishing has still been good, with fish responding well to the latest cold snap. Cooling water temperatures really help these finicky creatures get into a biting mood. Twitching jigs, casting spinners or plugs and bobber fishing eggs are all great choices when deciding what technique to use.  Find some nice walking speed water and look for rolling fish.  These acrobatic fish love to show themselves when more than just one or two are present.  So, looking for surface activity will definitely help you find where pods of fish are staging.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has continued to be a great option.  These fish are also responding well to cooling water temperatures and have really given anglers a treat by being more aggressive and active.  Sandshrimp, smelt, anchovies and herring have been this week's top producing baits.

    Tuna fishing has still been great when the ocean has allowed anglers to get out.  Everyday has been a  different story as far as what the fish are keying in on.  One day it’s a trolling bite and the fish are a little more spread out.  Then the next day the fish are schooled up more and you can fill the boat by jigging iron or fishing live bait.  Moral of the story, make sure you have as many techniques as you can on board so that you have exactly what you need for what the tuna want that day.

    Bottom fishing has been good with reports of fast limits for those that are looking to fill their freezers with fillets that are perfect for fish tacos.  Shrimp flies and vertical jigs were the two most productive techniques this past week.

    Crabbing continues to be good with a lot of really big crab in the mix recently.  These crab are getting fuller by the week and a limit of these fat keepers yields a lot of meat!  They also make for a great addition for those that are salmon fishing.  Drop your pots first thing in the morning and pull them before you head home and you will have plenty of fresh seafood for everyone on board.

    Trout fishing continues to be great, especially with the cooling temperatures.  These fish have really gotten aggressive and are moving back into the shallow waters. Casting spinners, spoons or flies have all worked well recently.  ODFW stocked more lakes this past week and just put 5,000 trophy trout into Dorena Reservoir.  That’s a lot of large trout that are ready to be caught

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 11, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/3

    Trevor from our Oregon City store has been finding his share of hatchery Coho in the Clackamas River. Both casting spinners and fishing roe under a float have been the ticket. Look for more fresh Coho to enter local rivers through the end of the month. Good luck! Trevor from our Oregon City store has been finding his share of hatchery Coho in the Clackamas River. Both casting spinners and fishing roe under a float have been the ticket. Look for more fresh Coho to enter local rivers through the end of the month. Good luck!

    Fall chinook fishing has been decent this past week along the Oregon Coast , with reports coming in from most all of the bays and estuaries south of Astoria.  The fish seem to be in transition from hanging out in the ocean to entering into the bay that their tributaries feed into.  The next decent rain we get will likely bring in a good wave of fish that can be targeted from the bay through the tidewater sections of most major rivers.  So far, fish have been caught trolling triangle flashers with herring, triangle flashers with spinners, 360° flashers with small spinners and folks fishing bobber and eggs farther up bays and into tidewater.  Once we get some really significant rain to bring river levels up, the drift boat fisheries will start to kick in and more opportunities will open up.  Back trolling Kwikfish or Mag Lips will be an awesome technique when trying to find these high water Kings.  Back-bouncing and bobber fishing eggs and shrimp will also be a widely used technique.

    Tributary coho fishing has still been good, with fish responding well to the latest cold snap. Cooling water temperatures really help these finicky creatures get into a biting mood. Twitching jigs, casting spinners or plugs and bobber fishing eggs are all great choices when deciding what technique to use.  Find some nice walking speed water and look for rolling fish.  These acrobatic fish love to show themselves when more than just one or two are present.  So, looking for surface activity will definitely help you find where pods of fish are staging.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has continued to be a great option.  These fish are also responding well to cooling water temperatures and have really given anglers a treat by being more aggressive and active.  Sandshrimp, smelt, anchovies and herring have been this week's top producing baits.

    Tuna fishing has still been great when the ocean has allowed anglers to get out.  Everyday has been a  different story as far as what the fish are keying in on.  One day it’s a trolling bite and the fish are a little more spread out.  Then the next day the fish are schooled up more and you can fill the boat by jigging iron or fishing live bait.  Moral of the story, make sure you have as many techniques as you can on board so that you have exactly what you need for what the tuna want that day.

    Bottom fishing has been good with reports of fast limits for those that are looking to fill their freezers with fillets that are perfect for fish tacos.  Shrimp flies and vertical jigs were the two most productive techniques this past week.

    Crabbing continues to be good with a lot of really big crab in the mix recently.  These crab are getting fuller by the week and a limit of these fat keepers yields a lot of meat!  They also make for a great addition for those that are salmon fishing.  Drop your pots first thing in the morning and pull them before you head home and you will have plenty of fresh seafood for everyone on board.

    Trout fishing continues to be great, especially with the cooling temperatures.  These fish have really gotten aggressive and are moving back into the shallow waters. Casting spinners, spoons or flies have all worked well recently.  ODFW stocked more lakes this past week and just put 5,000 trophy trout into Dorena Reservoir.  That’s a lot of large trout that are ready to be caught.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 04, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/26

    Tributary Coho Fishing continues to improve daily as more fish arrive to local rivers. Casting spinners and spoons, float fishing eggs, casting or trolling plugs and twitching jigs have all been taking their share of the fish. If you catch a nice hatchery Coho between now and October 31st, don’t forget to bring it into one of our three store locations to be entered into our Coho Derby. (All fish must be gutted prior to weigh-in.) Fish on! Tributary Coho Fishing continues to improve daily as more fish arrive to local rivers. Casting spinners and spoons, float fishing eggs, casting or trolling plugs and twitching jigs have all been taking their share of the fish. If you catch a nice hatchery Coho between now and October 31st, don’t forget to bring it into one of our three store locations to be entered into our Coho Derby. (All fish must be gutted prior to weigh-in.) Fish on!

    The ocean is still fishing well for coho and those that have been venturing out past the bar have also been targeting bottom fish.  This combo trip can make for very full freezers this time of year.  A lot of folks will troll for coho and typically put a few in the box and then switch gears and target bottom fish for a few hours to get a nice variety of fillets.  And if you dropped your crab pots on the way out, then you are likely going to have a bushel of keepers to clean as well!

    Astoria has still been fishing very well for coho up to the Tongue Point deadline.  These fish are still favoring large flood tides. Therefore, fishermen have been trying to intercept these fish all the way out at Buoy 10, and then chasing them up river as they push in with the tide.  The fleet has been fairly split between trolling small Hoochie spinners and trolling fresh anchovies.  Vary your depths as you troll to try and pinpoint where the fish are located in the water column.

    Nehalem and Tillamook Bay have both started putting out fish and fishermen have been finding success using a variety of techniques.  Trolling herring has been the age old go-to technique and still works very well.  However, the 360° Flasher craze has really taken hold in these two iconic fisheries.  Fishermen have sometimes been using Brad's Super Baits behind these flashers, however, small 3.5 size spinners have really been the go-to.

    Crabbing has been getting better every week as this season the crabbing can be the best of the year.  Bring up to 3 pots per person, make sure to keep fresh bait in them, and a boat limit of keepers is likely in your future.

    WDFW approves three-day razor clam dig on Long Beach beginning Sept. 27th
    Razor clam diggers can return to Long Beach for a three-day opening beginning Sept. 27.
    State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on morning low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

    The upcoming dig is for the following dates and morning low tides:
         ●     Sept. 27, Friday, 5:52 a.m. -0.9, Long Beach only
         ●     Sept. 28, Saturday, 6:36 a.m. -0.8, Long Beach only
         ●     Sept. 29, Sunday, 7:19 am -0.6, Long Beach only

    No digging is allowed after noon for these late September digs where low tide occurs in the morning.

    Tributary coho fishing has steadily improved, especially with the onset of  plentiful rainfall.  These fish  move on fresh shots of rain, so they have been piling into the Sandy, Clackamas, Lewis and even the Kalama.  As we continually get cooler temperatures, look for the bite to get even better.  Fishing eggs under a float, casting spinners or plugs and casting twitching jigs are all great options this time of year.  For those fishing from a boat and wanting to cover quite a bit of water, bobberdoggin’ is an under used technique that works extremely well.

    Trout fishing this time of year can be phenomenal, it just isn’t always on everyone’s radar.  These fish have spent the last few months in the deep, dark, cool waters of the lake and with all this recent rain, lakes and reservoirs have started to cool down. Fish are back on the prowl and cruising the shallows looking for an easy meal.  Targeting these fish can be as simple as casting and retrieving Rooster Tails or Kastmasters along the shoreline.  These fish can be extremely aggressive and will often chase down your offering.  Of course, fishing bait is always a great option whether under a bobber or off of the bottom.  Powerbait, nightcrawlers, single salmon eggs and even salad shrimp are all great bait choices.  Locally, Henry Hagg Lake just received 6,000 legal trout; along with another 200 trophy trout and Trillium Lake received 3,600 legal trout and another 250 trophy trout.

    Sturgeon retention was open on Saturday the 21st and also this coming Saturday the 28th, from Wauna to Bonneville deadline.  The fishing has been quite good and even if you can’t get out on one of the retention days, don’t hesitate to go play catch and release.  These prehistoric creatures make for a fun day on the water.  This can be a great fishery to try when introducing new anglers to the sport.  Sandshrimp, squid and anchovies have been the most productive baits recently.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 27, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report