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  • Outdoor Report 12/6

    hunting

     

    Winter steelhead fishing is just getting going with several north coast hatcheries already receiving some hatchery steelhead back to their traps. These early fish are on a one-way mission to their hatchery so a lot of times, fishing near the hatchery can give you a higher chance of hooking up with a fish. Drift fishing eggs, shrimp or yarn are a some of the top choices this time of the year, especially when the water is high and off color. When the river is dropping and clearing up, a lot of folks will switch to float fishing jigs, worms or beads. Bobber Doggin is also a very productive technique when targeting these fish. Eggs, yarn, beads, corkies and cheaters are all great choices when setting up your Bobber Doggin rig. Once we get another big shot of rain, look for good pushes of fish to head upstream, making targeting fish throughout the river system, a good option for success.

    Catch and release fishing for sturgeon has been excellent this week with a lot of folks targeting the lower Willamette and Portland harbor area. There has been a good grade of fish being caught, with lots of healthy fish in the mix. Squid, herring, anchovies and sandshrimp have all been the top bait choices!

    Crabbing continues to be very productive, with lots of quality keeper size crab in the mix. From the northern coast to the southern coast, the crabbing has been very consistent this year.

    When the ocean has allowed people to get across the bar, the bottom fishing has been great. Lots of bass and Lingcod to be caught. Most fisherman are either using jigs or plastics. Jigs include vertical jigs, such as laser minnows or butterfly jigs. For the fisherman who prefer plastics, using large curly tail grubs or P-Line rock cod rigs can also be very beneficial in hooking up with these species on the water!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Dec 07, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/29

    Ad Banner image 11_30

     

    The rain that we have gotten this last week should be bringing in new batches of winter steelhead to a good portion of the rivers throughout the Northwest. These early fish are definitely good biters with most anglers having success using eggs, yarn, beads, worms, jigs and sandshrimp. After the rivers start coming down, look for these early fish to be in walking speed tail outs, slow water inside seams, and anywhere that the current breaks down to a walking speed. Many of these early hatchery fish are on a one-way mission to get to their hatchery. Therefore, when the water is high, try your best to focus your efforts near the hatchery. As the water starts to drop, the fish will begin to slow down, and you will have a higher shot at targeting these fish throughout the river system.

    Another fishery to think about this time of year is to target summer run steelhead. These fish came into the river within the last few months. However, summer steelhead are sexually immature, so they will be hanging around for quite a while. These fish are typically eager biters with eggs, jigs, prawns, and pink worms are all being great choices of bait when targeting these beautiful fish.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been exceptionally great in the lower Willamette as of late. These fish have been determined biters with lots of boats having double digit days. Sandshrimp, squid and herring have been the top choices with the most success!

    Bottom fishing has been doing well, when the ocean cooperates and allows people out past the bar. Lingcod fishing has been certainly good with reports coming in of really nice size Lings being caught. Vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs have been the top producing baits.

    Waterfowl hunters have been getting the rain that we have so desperately needed. There have been many reports of birds starting to enter the wetland areas. These areas should continue to get better and better with the more rain we get!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 30, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/22

    Trevor from our Oregon City store with an awesome early winter steelhead that he caught last Friday. The fish took a cerise and white jig fished under a float. Trevor from our Oregon City store with an awesome early winter steelhead that he caught last Friday. The fish took a cerise and white jig fished under a float.

    There are still a few coho available on the Sandy and Clackamas Rivers, but the run is starting to wane and there are many more wild fish around than hatchery keepers. However, B-run hatchery coho are still available in many Southwest Washington streams, and a variety of techniques will catch them, including twitching jigs, hardware and bait. The Klickitat River in particular has fished very well for coho recently, with mostly hatchery fish available. A pink or purple twitching jig has been deadly there. There are also some late summer steelhead still available in the Clackamas, Deschutes, Wilson, Nestucca and elsewhere, but at this point most anglers are anxiously awaiting winter steelhead.

    We’ve heard a few rumors of some early winters caught already, and our own Trevor LaValley caught one last Friday. Once we get some more rain, look to the usual places for some early-returning hatchery fish like the North Fork Nehalem or Washington’s Elochoman River; these two streams often provide the very first winter steelhead catches of the year. The Sandy, Kalama and just about any coastal stream can also be sleepers for a few early winter fish.  With Thanksgiving as the traditional kickoff to steelhead season, now is the time to tie rigs, prep gear and fill those reels with fresh line for one of the greatest sport fish that swims! Good luck.

    Trout fishing is still fair at lower elevation lakes, including Henry Hagg near Forest Grove. In fact, there are some really big, 5-15 pound brood trout available at Hagg and they are suckers for a slowly trolled Mag Lip, Hot Shot or Flatfish. Also, ODFW has started its winter trout stocking program—including larger trophy-sized fish—and there are some great opportunities for some winter trout fishing at lower elevation lakes. Canby Pond was stocked October 22nd with 500 legal trout and 100 larger trophies, and this is a great place to take kids locally to catch some trout. Worms under a float or Powerbait fished up from the bottom works great here.  Sheridan Pond, Huddleston Pond, Mt Hood Pond and Blue Lake also received large brood trout this week, and Junction City Pond got a plant of 50 surplus summer steelhead.

    Catch-and-release sturgeon fishing remains excellent on the Willamette River, with tons (literally!) of quality fish available to test your gear and stamina. Smelt, herring, squid and anchovies will all work at times, and it’s best to have more than one bait on hand, but sand shrimp is always the #1 bait for Willamette River sturgeon this time of year. Good luck!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 20, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/15

     Marissa from our Oregon City store with an awesome sturgeon caught and released from the Willamette River recently while fishing with Dave Eng of Dave’s Fisheng Guide Service: 503-341-8863. Catch and release sturgeon fishing on the Willamette remains excellent right now, with tons (literally!) of quality fish around to test your gear and stamina!
    Marissa from our Oregon City store with an awesome sturgeon caught and released from the Willamette River recently while fishing with Dave Eng of Dave’s Fisheng Guide Service: 503-341-8863. Catch and release sturgeon fishing on the Willamette remains excellent right now, with tons (literally!) of quality fish around to test your gear and stamina!

    Coho fishing is still going with some rivers getting a pretty good return of B Run coho this year. There are still plenty of chrome bright fish to be caught. They will bite everything from jigs, eggs, spinners, spoons and plugs. Once you find a pod of these fresh fish you can usually catch quite a few of them, as they are typically great biters.

    Summer steelhead fishing this time of year can be killer as the rivers have cooled down and the fish have been hanging around for awhile and are willing biters. Coon shrimp, jigs, eggs, spinners, spoons and plugs are all techniques that will produce these beautiful fish.

    Winter steelhead are starting to trickle in and these early fish are usually aggressive as they are fresh from the ocean and on a one-way mission up river. Pink worms, jigs, beads and plugs are all great options when chasing these early fish. As you can see a lot of these techniques are used for summer, winter steelhead and coho. So, when using them you never know what you might hook, which always keeps it interesting and exciting.

    Bottom fishing has been great when the ocean allows you to get out. The bass & lingcod fishing have been consistent. Vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs have been the two best baits.

    Crabbing remains good with people reporting good success all along the coast. Remember, you can use up to 3 pots per person, so having as many pots as you can for the people on your boat will up your catch rate.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has been excellent with fishermen finding good success in the Willamette harbor. The baits that have been the top producers have been sand shrimp, squid and herring. Keeping a few different scents on hand can be crucial at times of the bite slows down.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 16, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/8

    ggressive B-run coho are currently available in many Southwest Washington streams. Aggressive B-run coho are currently available in many Southwest Washington streams.

     

    Coho fishing in the southwest Washington rivers has been getting better as more of the B run coho are showing up. They are usually bigger than the A run coho and are better biters as well. That means they will bite a wide variety of baits including plugs, jigs, eggs, spinners and spoons. They love to find the soft pockets on the side of the river, so if you can find a pile of them tucked up against some woody structure you may be in for a hay day tossing jigs, spinners and plugs at them.

    Winter steelhead are almost here. Starting now through the beginning of December we usually start to see photos circulating around of fresh hatchery steelhead. These early fish are typically caught by those targeting chinook. However, there are a few people that will start to actively target steelhead and they are usually the ones that intercept the first few pushes of fish. Pink worms, small clusters of eggs, jigs, beads and plugs are all great options when targeting these fresh from the ocean steelhead.

    Bottom fishing is good, when the ocean allows you to get out. The bass fishing has been great with good size fish being caught. Vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs have been the best two baits.

    Crabbing remains good with people reporting success all up and down the coast line. Remember you are allowed 3 pots per person, so having as many pots as you can for the people on your boat will up your success rate and keep everyone on board busy.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has continued to be good with fishermen finding great success in the Willamette. The baits that have been the top producers are squid, sand shrimp and herring. However, that doesn’t mean all your traditional sturgeon baits won’t work. Keeping a few different scents on hand can be crucial at times.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 08, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 11/1

    Scrappy chum salmon are currently available for catch-and-release fishing on Oregon's Kilchis and Miami Rivers, as well as a bunch of streams in Southwest Washington. The Steelhead Scampi from BnR Tackle is deadly for chum when fished on a quarter-ounce jig head under a float! Scrappy chum salmon are currently available for catch-and-release fishing on Oregon's Kilchis and Miami Rivers, as well as a bunch of streams in Southwest Washington. The Steelhead Scampi from BnR Tackle is deadly for chum when fished on a quarter-ounce jig head under a float!

    Many southwest Washington rivers are getting their first shot of B-Run coho. These coho are usually a bit larger and bigger bodied than the earlier returning A-Run coho. Now that the water is higher and colder they will come in and typically they are very good biters. There is a fairly long list of things that they will bite including Wiggle Warts, twitching jigs, spinners, spoons and traditional bobber and jig. Eggs are also a great option; you can fish them either under a float or drift fish them along the bottom. This fishery typically lasts into the beginning of December with the coho coming in waves as we get more rain.

    Crabbing along the coast has been steady. October and November are typically some of the best months for crabbing because crab are at their best quality and largest size this time of year. Old salmon carcasses, chicken and even old freezer burned bait are all great bait options. Bringing multiple pots is beneficial because you will be constantly picking and resetting pots, keeping your bait fresh and pots clean of seaweed and kelp.

    Summer steelhead fishing can be amazing this time of year. These fish have sat through the hottest parts of summer and are finally getting a reprieve with all the cold rain we are getting. Since they won’t be spawning for several more months they will still be aggressive and great biters. Jigs under a bobber, spinnersspoons  and small plugs are all great options when chasing these acrobatic fish. If you’re allowed to fish bait on the river you are fishing, then coonstripe shrimp, sand shrimp, eggs and prawns are all great options. Also, with the spawning salmon that are in the rivers you may find summer steelhead sitting a little way behind them picking up some of the loose eggs that get swept down river, so fishing a bead or single egg imitation is another great option.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has also been consistent for those that have been targeting them. Sturgeon fishing can be a great way to get the whole family out on the water and introduce young anglers to the sport. Smelt, herring, sand shrimp and rollmop have all been productive baits lately. Squid is also a top producer.

    Duck hunting has been good with the nasty weather this week benefiting most hunters. With much more rain in the forecast, waterfowl hunting should stay good for awhile.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Nov 01, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/25

    Marissa, from our Oregon City location, caught and released a nice Sturgeon while fishing with Dave Eng of Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine. Marissa, from our Oregon City location, caught and released a nice Sturgeon while fishing with Dave Eng of Salmon Trout Steelheader Magazine.

    Locally the coho fishing has remained consistent with fish spread throughout the systems; even with the lack of rain there are still plenty of fish to go after. There is rain in the forecast, so expect the Sandy and Clackamas to both get one more good shot of coho. They will bite a variety of things, but the most popular techniques are bobber and eggs, swinging spinners or plugs and twitching jigs. Don’t be surprised if you catch a summer steelhead while targeting these coho. The summer steelhead will also like the shot of rain and will be aggressive for most of those same techniques.

    On the east side there are some summer steelhead to be caught, along with great trout fishing. The steelhead this time of year will still bite spinners and spoons with reckless abandon. However, since the evening temperatures have started to drop, and the water temps have cooled down, they love a well-placed jig, fly or bead. Coming off months of warm water temps, they will be eager to bite.

    Depending on the ocean conditions bottom fishing is still good. On the days the ocean allows us to get out, the black bass and lingcod fishing has been very consistent. Vertical jigging, large curly tail grubs, swimbaits and shrimp flies are all great options when picking out your gear.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing remains another excellent choice for those that are wanting to get out on the water for some fun. Both the Willamette and Columbia are kicking out good numbers of sturgeon. Squid, sand shrimp, herring and anchovies are all great bait choices.

    Trout fishing is still going well, there are lots of options for high mountain lakes as there really isn’t much snow to speak of, yet. The trout know what time of year it is and therefore are trying to pack on the pounds before their lakes freeze over or the roads leading into them become impassable due to snow. Spinners, Flatfish, 2.0 Mag Lips, Wedding Rings and trolled flies are all great choices. Bait, of course, is always one of the top producers with PowerBait and nightcrawlers being the most productive lately, but Berkeley Gulp products are right up there with the natural bait.

    For those that are wanting to do some bird hunting pheasant hunting has been productive. Once we get some good rain and wind storms to move into the area, the duck and goose hunting should drastically get better.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 25, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/18

    Timothy Lake is currently offering plenty of nice trout, like this gorgeous 16-incher caught last Monday. Timothy Lake is currently offering plenty of nice trout, like this gorgeous 16-incher caught last Monday.

    Chinook fishing along the coast has produced some nice quality fish lately and depending on the location you may find a few coho in the mix. In the bays there are those who fish a 360° flasher with either a small 3.5 spinner or Brad’s Cut Plug or Super Bait behind it, something small that will not alter the flasher’s rotation, and those that fish a triangle flasher with Cut Plug, herring, or larger spinners. Both techniques work well, but on certain days one will out fish the other. Tillamook Bay salmon fishing picked up this week, and with rain in the forecast, we will likely see better fishing soon on our coastal bays and rivers.

    If you are bottom fishing the rockfish limit has gone back up to five and you are able to harvest two lingcod as well. You can come home with some serious meat for the freezer. Vertical jigs, curly tail grubs and even swimbaits have all been working well.

    The many jetties that are along the Oregon coast are fisheries that are often overlooked. Fishing off a jetty can be good for a variety of bottom fish as well as those wanting to crab at the same time. Fishing sand shrimp, grubs and swimbaits are all great options when chasing these bottom fish. At times you never know what you may hook, so the anticipation can be half the fun. Fishing from jetties is not without its hazards, so be careful and watch out for rogue waves.

    Trout fishing is still good, and some lakes have started to receive their fall/winter stockings. These fish will typically be great biters and can be a lot fun for the whole family, especially when the weather is nice. Trolling is an easy way to get everyone involved and can also be extremely productive. Wedding Rings, Flatfish, Panther Martins and Rooster Tails are all great options when trolling for trout. Timothy Lake has recently been very good with many trout in the 14-20” range. Orange PowerBait fished off the bottom on a 24” leader has been very effective.

    Locally, the tributary fishing for coho continues to be steady. There are a decent number of fish around but the lack of rain has made some days a little tougher. Fishing eggs either under a bobber or drift fishing them has been a good go to technique, twitching jigs and spinners is also a popular technique. Once we get a good shot of rain, look for both the Sandy and Clackamas coho fishing to be good.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 19, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/11

    Scrappy searun cutthroat are currently available on many coastal rivers and estuaries and will hit a variety of flies and lures, though it's hard to beat a good old Rooster Tail spinner in black, yellow or "coach dog." Many coastal rivers are open for trout angling through October 31st, but be sure to check the specific regulations for the water you intend to fish. Scrappy searun cutthroat are currently available on many coastal rivers and estuaries and will hit a variety of flies and lures, though it's hard to beat a good old Rooster Tail spinner in black, yellow or "coach dog." Many coastal rivers are open for trout angling through October 31st, but be sure to check the specific regulations for the water you intend to fish.

    Fall Chinook fishing on coastal bays and tidewater remains challenging, but there are some fish around and it takes dedication and perseverance to connect with them. That said, there have been some sporadic episodes of good fishing, so if you happen to be at the right place at the right time you could see some good action. Another bright spot: the fish being caught have been of very nice size so far this season. It’s not too late to see a good surge of fish on the coast, but most agree that it will take some Fall weather with a good shot of rain to make it happen. Also, there have been a lot of jacks around, which hopefully bodes well for next year’s run. Crabbing also remains very good at this time.

    Monday’s rain was just enough to add some color to local rivers and both the Sandy and Clackamas have coho scattered throughout. Casting spinners, plugs and twitching jigs will all take fish at times, but it’s hard to beat roe fished under a float when the fish are being difficult. In the deeper, slower holes that coho often frequent, casting and slowly retrieving a Wiggle Wart or Brad’s Wiggler can be extremely effective and is a relaxing way to fish. Plus, strikes on plugs can be vicious!

    Chum salmon will be showing up to Tillamook Bay any day now and will be available for catch-and-release fishing in the Miami and Kilchis Rivers until November 15th, after which point it is closed to targeting them. Chum can be extremely aggressive biters and are a great way to introduce kids to salmon fishing. Many southwest Washington streams also have good chum runs and they get more widespread the further north you travel. Chum will hit a variety of lures, but it’s hard to beat a pink or chartreuse jig fished under a float. Another killer lure for chum is the Steelhead Scampi from BnR Tackle fished on a ¼ oz. jig head under a float —chum just can’t seem to resist them! If the fish are being finicky as they sometimes are, try tipping your jig with a small chunk of prawn meat or sand shrimp as this will often make them snap. Chum are a tough, hardy species, perfect for catch-and-release as long as they are treated with respect and gently released to go about their business of making more chum salmon.

    For warmwater anglers, the next few weeks are sort of the last hoorah for bass, walleye and panfish angling before cooler water really slows the bite. Not that you can’t catch these species during the winter months, it just takes much more patience and effort to do so. But right now these species are still actively feeding in preparation for winter, so go get ‘em while you can!

    Trout fishing has been very good at a long list of rivers and lakes throughout our region as the fish sense the onset of winter and gorge to build their fat reserves. Timothy Lake has been producing some nice rainbows and brook trout for anglers fishing Powerbait, nightcrawlers, flies and lures. Trout fishing on the Deschutes has also been good recently, with the fish dining on a variety of subsurface flies and lures. Some of the biggest trout of the year are caught in Autumn, so take advantage of the recent good weather and get the kids out for one last trout trip before it starts raining for the next six months!

    Cooler water temps also have the sturgeon bite improving on the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, offering a solid option for some good catch-and-release fishing close to home for one of the coolest fish to swim in Pacific Northwest waters. Fish on!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 12, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/4

    Customer Seth Fisher with a beautiful Fall Chinook from an Oregon coast stream. Customer Seth Fisher with a beautiful Fall Chinook from an Oregon coast stream.

    Locally, the Clackamas River has coho staging at the confluence with the Willamette, and bank anglers are catching them by casting hardware like #4 Blue Fox Vibrax Spinners in blue, purple and chartreuse. Meanwhile, boat anglers are catching a few in the Willamette by trolling Wiggle Warts and Brad's Wigglers in a variety of colors, but pink or fluorescent red and orange are old standbys. Coho are also spread throughout the Clackamas itself, but are very skittish in the low, clear water, and fishing early or late in the day is a decided advantage. Spinners, eggs or twitching jigs will all work at times, but the key has been finding unpressured fish. There are also a few summer steelhead being caught in the Clack by those targeting coho, and some of them have been very fresh, high-quality new arrivals. The Sandy also has some coho available, and the forecasted rain should draw more fish into each system just as we reach the historical peak run timing.

    Albacore tuna fishing is still going strong and it's possible this fishery will continue through the end of October. Typically, tuna this time of year are fatter and more selective, so having multiple techniques on board can change an "ok" day into an amazing day. Tuna clones, X-raps and cedar plugs will all work when lining-out your trolling arsenal. Vertical jigs are a must-have for when you find a good school of tuna and jigging iron can help rack up the numbers in a hurry. Live bait is always a smart option to keep on board and swimbaits should also be brought for when the fish stay just out of reach of your live bait.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing can be phenomenal this time of year. With very little pressure, these prehistoric creatures are willing to bite. Find a good drop-off and you will be in business. Squid, herring, sand shrimp and anchovies are great bait options.

    Bottom fishing is still going well with a lot of nice size sea bass in the mix. Curly tail grubs, shrimp flies and vertical jigs are all good options when chasing these delicious fish. Success this time of year usually depends on ocean conditions, so keep a keen weather-eye out and if the ocean gets lumpy, fish for salmon in the bays instead.

    Crabbing has been great and lots of fishermen are getting their limits rather quickly. Shad, chicken and fish carcasses are the top producing baits. Having multiple pots will help you get your limits faster and keep everyone entertained picking and setting.

    Surf perch prefer an incoming tide and tend to school up, so if you’re making cast after cast with no bites, keep moving. Once you find them, try to stay on them and you will have consistent action. Sand shrimp and clam necks are surf perch favorites when it comes to real bait. For those wanting something artificial, the Gulp Sandworm is your best choice. They come in multiple colors so bring a couple options as you never know what flavor they will key in on.

    Fall Chinook fishing is spotty on coastal estuaries, but there has been some decent action at times, and some big fish have been caught recently from Tillamook Bay, Nehalem and Nestucca tidewater. Rain will help draw more fish into the bays and tidewater stretches of rivers, as we are nearing the time that these fish must push up river. Those having success right now are catching fish while trolling 360° Flashers and small spinners, triangle flashers with a green or blue label cut-plug herring, or just trolling a herring with no flasher. Again, keeping a few options on board will greatly increase your odds.

    Trout fishing can be awesome this time of year, especially in the higher mountain lakes. The trout are starting to feel the cooler nights and know that winter is on its way, so they are starting to stock up their fat deposits for cold weather times. Plunking Bait on the bottom is always a great option, however, trolling flies, Flatfish or small Rapalas will also entice these beautiful fish into biting. Good luck!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 04, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report