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  • Outdoor Report 10/10

    Mike Kostel caught and released this rowdy Deschutes River steelhead this past Monday while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Pete Field. Steelhead anglers on the Deschutes are currently seeing some of the best action of the season, with fish being caught on flies, bobber and jig, spinners and plugs. (Pete Field Guide Service: 503-539-0587.) Mike Kostel caught and released this rowdy Deschutes River steelhead this past Monday while fishing with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Pete Field. Steelhead anglers on the Deschutes are currently seeing some of the best action of the season, with fish being caught on flies, bobber and jig, spinners and plugs. (Pete Field Guide Service: 503-539-0587.)

    Fall chinook fishing has been decent this past week along the Oregon Coast , with reports coming in from most all of the bays and estuaries south of Astoria.  The fish seem to be in transition from hanging out in the ocean to entering into the bay that their tributaries feed into.  The next decent rain we get will likely bring in a good wave of fish that can be targeted from the bay through the tidewater sections of most major rivers.  So far, fish have been caught trolling triangle flashers with herring, triangle flashers with spinners, 360° flashers with small spinners and folks fishing bobber and eggs farther up bays and into tidewater.  Once we get some really significant rain to bring river levels up, the drift boat fisheries will start to kick in and more opportunities will open up.  Back trolling Kwikfish or Mag Lips will be an awesome technique when trying to find these high water Kings.  Back-bouncing and bobber fishing eggs and shrimp will also be a widely used technique.

    Tributary coho fishing has still been good, with fish responding well to the latest cold snap. Cooling water temperatures really help these finicky creatures get into a biting mood. Twitching jigs, casting spinners or plugs and bobber fishing eggs are all great choices when deciding what technique to use.  Find some nice walking speed water and look for rolling fish.  These acrobatic fish love to show themselves when more than just one or two are present.  So, looking for surface activity will definitely help you find where pods of fish are staging.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has continued to be a great option.  These fish are also responding well to cooling water temperatures and have really given anglers a treat by being more aggressive and active.  Sandshrimp, smelt, anchovies and herring have been this week's top producing baits.

    Tuna fishing has still been great when the ocean has allowed anglers to get out.  Everyday has been a  different story as far as what the fish are keying in on.  One day it’s a trolling bite and the fish are a little more spread out.  Then the next day the fish are schooled up more and you can fill the boat by jigging iron or fishing live bait.  Moral of the story, make sure you have as many techniques as you can on board so that you have exactly what you need for what the tuna want that day.

    Bottom fishing has been good with reports of fast limits for those that are looking to fill their freezers with fillets that are perfect for fish tacos.  Shrimp flies and vertical jigs were the two most productive techniques this past week.

    Crabbing continues to be good with a lot of really big crab in the mix recently.  These crab are getting fuller by the week and a limit of these fat keepers yields a lot of meat!  They also make for a great addition for those that are salmon fishing.  Drop your pots first thing in the morning and pull them before you head home and you will have plenty of fresh seafood for everyone on board.

    Trout fishing continues to be great, especially with the cooling temperatures.  These fish have really gotten aggressive and are moving back into the shallow waters. Casting spinners, spoons or flies have all worked well recently.  ODFW stocked more lakes this past week and just put 5,000 trophy trout into Dorena Reservoir.  That’s a lot of large trout that are ready to be caught

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 11, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/3

    Trevor from our Oregon City store has been finding his share of hatchery Coho in the Clackamas River. Both casting spinners and fishing roe under a float have been the ticket. Look for more fresh Coho to enter local rivers through the end of the month. Good luck! Trevor from our Oregon City store has been finding his share of hatchery Coho in the Clackamas River. Both casting spinners and fishing roe under a float have been the ticket. Look for more fresh Coho to enter local rivers through the end of the month. Good luck!

    Fall chinook fishing has been decent this past week along the Oregon Coast , with reports coming in from most all of the bays and estuaries south of Astoria.  The fish seem to be in transition from hanging out in the ocean to entering into the bay that their tributaries feed into.  The next decent rain we get will likely bring in a good wave of fish that can be targeted from the bay through the tidewater sections of most major rivers.  So far, fish have been caught trolling triangle flashers with herring, triangle flashers with spinners, 360° flashers with small spinners and folks fishing bobber and eggs farther up bays and into tidewater.  Once we get some really significant rain to bring river levels up, the drift boat fisheries will start to kick in and more opportunities will open up.  Back trolling Kwikfish or Mag Lips will be an awesome technique when trying to find these high water Kings.  Back-bouncing and bobber fishing eggs and shrimp will also be a widely used technique.

    Tributary coho fishing has still been good, with fish responding well to the latest cold snap. Cooling water temperatures really help these finicky creatures get into a biting mood. Twitching jigs, casting spinners or plugs and bobber fishing eggs are all great choices when deciding what technique to use.  Find some nice walking speed water and look for rolling fish.  These acrobatic fish love to show themselves when more than just one or two are present.  So, looking for surface activity will definitely help you find where pods of fish are staging.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing has continued to be a great option.  These fish are also responding well to cooling water temperatures and have really given anglers a treat by being more aggressive and active.  Sandshrimp, smelt, anchovies and herring have been this week's top producing baits.

    Tuna fishing has still been great when the ocean has allowed anglers to get out.  Everyday has been a  different story as far as what the fish are keying in on.  One day it’s a trolling bite and the fish are a little more spread out.  Then the next day the fish are schooled up more and you can fill the boat by jigging iron or fishing live bait.  Moral of the story, make sure you have as many techniques as you can on board so that you have exactly what you need for what the tuna want that day.

    Bottom fishing has been good with reports of fast limits for those that are looking to fill their freezers with fillets that are perfect for fish tacos.  Shrimp flies and vertical jigs were the two most productive techniques this past week.

    Crabbing continues to be good with a lot of really big crab in the mix recently.  These crab are getting fuller by the week and a limit of these fat keepers yields a lot of meat!  They also make for a great addition for those that are salmon fishing.  Drop your pots first thing in the morning and pull them before you head home and you will have plenty of fresh seafood for everyone on board.

    Trout fishing continues to be great, especially with the cooling temperatures.  These fish have really gotten aggressive and are moving back into the shallow waters. Casting spinners, spoons or flies have all worked well recently.  ODFW stocked more lakes this past week and just put 5,000 trophy trout into Dorena Reservoir.  That’s a lot of large trout that are ready to be caught.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out.  Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 04, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/26

    Tributary Coho Fishing continues to improve daily as more fish arrive to local rivers. Casting spinners and spoons, float fishing eggs, casting or trolling plugs and twitching jigs have all been taking their share of the fish. If you catch a nice hatchery Coho between now and October 31st, don’t forget to bring it into one of our three store locations to be entered into our Coho Derby. (All fish must be gutted prior to weigh-in.) Fish on! Tributary Coho Fishing continues to improve daily as more fish arrive to local rivers. Casting spinners and spoons, float fishing eggs, casting or trolling plugs and twitching jigs have all been taking their share of the fish. If you catch a nice hatchery Coho between now and October 31st, don’t forget to bring it into one of our three store locations to be entered into our Coho Derby. (All fish must be gutted prior to weigh-in.) Fish on!

    The ocean is still fishing well for coho and those that have been venturing out past the bar have also been targeting bottom fish.  This combo trip can make for very full freezers this time of year.  A lot of folks will troll for coho and typically put a few in the box and then switch gears and target bottom fish for a few hours to get a nice variety of fillets.  And if you dropped your crab pots on the way out, then you are likely going to have a bushel of keepers to clean as well!

    Astoria has still been fishing very well for coho up to the Tongue Point deadline.  These fish are still favoring large flood tides. Therefore, fishermen have been trying to intercept these fish all the way out at Buoy 10, and then chasing them up river as they push in with the tide.  The fleet has been fairly split between trolling small Hoochie spinners and trolling fresh anchovies.  Vary your depths as you troll to try and pinpoint where the fish are located in the water column.

    Nehalem and Tillamook Bay have both started putting out fish and fishermen have been finding success using a variety of techniques.  Trolling herring has been the age old go-to technique and still works very well.  However, the 360° Flasher craze has really taken hold in these two iconic fisheries.  Fishermen have sometimes been using Brad's Super Baits behind these flashers, however, small 3.5 size spinners have really been the go-to.

    Crabbing has been getting better every week as this season the crabbing can be the best of the year.  Bring up to 3 pots per person, make sure to keep fresh bait in them, and a boat limit of keepers is likely in your future.

    WDFW approves three-day razor clam dig on Long Beach beginning Sept. 27th
    Razor clam diggers can return to Long Beach for a three-day opening beginning Sept. 27.
    State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on morning low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

    The upcoming dig is for the following dates and morning low tides:
         ●     Sept. 27, Friday, 5:52 a.m. -0.9, Long Beach only
         ●     Sept. 28, Saturday, 6:36 a.m. -0.8, Long Beach only
         ●     Sept. 29, Sunday, 7:19 am -0.6, Long Beach only

    No digging is allowed after noon for these late September digs where low tide occurs in the morning.

    Tributary coho fishing has steadily improved, especially with the onset of  plentiful rainfall.  These fish  move on fresh shots of rain, so they have been piling into the Sandy, Clackamas, Lewis and even the Kalama.  As we continually get cooler temperatures, look for the bite to get even better.  Fishing eggs under a float, casting spinners or plugs and casting twitching jigs are all great options this time of year.  For those fishing from a boat and wanting to cover quite a bit of water, bobberdoggin’ is an under used technique that works extremely well.

    Trout fishing this time of year can be phenomenal, it just isn’t always on everyone’s radar.  These fish have spent the last few months in the deep, dark, cool waters of the lake and with all this recent rain, lakes and reservoirs have started to cool down. Fish are back on the prowl and cruising the shallows looking for an easy meal.  Targeting these fish can be as simple as casting and retrieving Rooster Tails or Kastmasters along the shoreline.  These fish can be extremely aggressive and will often chase down your offering.  Of course, fishing bait is always a great option whether under a bobber or off of the bottom.  Powerbait, nightcrawlers, single salmon eggs and even salad shrimp are all great bait choices.  Locally, Henry Hagg Lake just received 6,000 legal trout; along with another 200 trophy trout and Trillium Lake received 3,600 legal trout and another 250 trophy trout.

    Sturgeon retention was open on Saturday the 21st and also this coming Saturday the 28th, from Wauna to Bonneville deadline.  The fishing has been quite good and even if you can’t get out on one of the retention days, don’t hesitate to go play catch and release.  These prehistoric creatures make for a fun day on the water.  This can be a great fishery to try when introducing new anglers to the sport.  Sandshrimp, squid and anchovies have been the most productive baits recently.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 27, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/19

    As the boat’s on the water begin to get fewer, the fish remain to get bigger! Fisherman’s Pro Josiah Darr continues to have success putting Coho in the hands of his clients in Astoria! Book a trip today:  JDarr Guided Fishing (206) 660-1490. As the boat’s on the water begin to get fewer, the fish remain to get bigger! Fisherman’s Pro Josiah Darr continues to have success putting Coho in the hands of his clients in Astoria! Book a trip today:
    JDarr Guided Fishing (206) 660-1490.

    Astoria Coho fishing is still rocking and rolling and the fish are getting bigger by the tide! These fish have really been flooding the estuary on the first incoming tide of the day. Whether you are a fisherman that likes to fish spinners or bait, either way will work as fish have been eating them all. Trolling triangle flashers on the outgoing and 360o flashers on the flood tide has been the two best options.

    Tributary Coho fishing has started to get consistent. The fish are responding to the recent rains we have been having. Casting spinners, spoons or plugs have been a great choice when trying to locate traveling fish. Once you find them, fishermen have been casting twitching jigs as well as eggs under floats or drift fished in the faster water. Try and focus on water that’s at least walking speed as the fish in the stagnant water may roll around a lot, but you may find it hard to get them to bite.

    Tillamook and Astoria have both started to fish well this last weeks. Again, the recent rains have really jump started these fish into thinking its time to head up stream. Typically trolling Herring or larger size spinners have been the two most popular techniques. However, trolling 360o flashers and small 3.5 size spinners quickly has become a go-to method.

    Walleye fishing up the Columbia River Gorge has steadily been good. With very few people targeting them the action has been fast paced and a good grade of fish has been around. Trolling worm harnesses along long flats has been an easy way to find fish. Trolling stick baits has also been a good way to entice them to bite.

    Trout fishing has been good throughout the local area. The cooling temperatures has put these fish back on the bite. Early mornings and late evenings have still been the best, however as the rivers and lakes continues to cool the Trout are staying active throughout the day. Casting spinners and trolling plugs has been a killer way to entice these fish. Bait fishing has also been productive either under a float or on the bottom.

    Tuna fishing has been amazing this summer and has continued to be great, even with the dismal weather. Trolling, jigging, fishing live bait and casting swim baits have all been taking fish. Once you hook up, try and get as much gear in the water as possible. Keeping the fish near your gear is paramount in loading up your fish boxes.

    ODFW has given us a two-day retention season on Sturgeon coming up the 21st and 28th of September. These fish really haven’t had much pressure on them recently, so the fishing should be good. Herring, Anchovies, Squid and Sand Shrimp are all great bait options when trying to find that delicious keeper.

    Crabbing has been getting better and better. Most local bays and estuaries have had good crabbing and look for it to get even better as we transition into October.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 20, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/12

    Salmon fishing from the Pacific Ocean to the Columbia River above the Bonneville Dam has been exceptionally good. There has been consistent reports of Coho caught up river all the way to the ocean. Those chasing Chinook has also been finding success above Bonneville Dam. Salmon are everywhere! Salmon fishing from the Pacific Ocean to the Columbia River above the Bonneville Dam has been exceptionally good. There has been consistent reports of Coho caught up river all the way to the ocean. Those chasing Chinook has also been finding success above Bonneville Dam. Salmon are everywhere!

    The Coho fishing in the lower Columbia has been good, especially those fishing down in the Astoria/ Buoy 10 area. These fish have really flooded the river on the last set of large tides and are heading up river in force. In the estuary, this fish can be caught on just about anything. Most fishermen troll with flashers and bait or spinners when in Astoria. However, once the fish hit the warm water of the Columbia and get above Tongue Point, they tend to stray away from the bait bite and key in on spinners and even plugs. Folks can troll spinners and lead or smaller spinners behind 360 flashers. Try focusing your efforts a little bit suspended in the water column and around cold-water inlets such as the mouth of the Cowlitz, Lewis and Sandy. If you happen to find fish piled up at the mouths of one of these areas and are having trouble getting them to bite try some twitching jigs, sometimes it can be the missing ingredient and will get the bite going.

    Chinook fishing above Bonneville Dam is still a viable option. Again, focusing on cold water inlets will be your best bet. These fish tend to school up, so fishing eggs and Sand Shrimp is a great technique. For those that are really wanting to troll, 360o Flashers and Super Baits or small spinners will also work well.

    Coho fishing has already started on local tributaries with some new fish showing up on every new tide. These early fish can be super aggressive and want to chase spinners, plugs, spoons and bait. Target faster moving water to get after these aggressive fish.

    Tillamook Bay has had a few fish move in the bay recently. Typically this fishery doesn’t get rocking until the end of September, although with all the rain we are having there could easily be a good shot of fish any day. Trolling triangle flashers and Herring has been a go-to technique in Tillamook and Nehalem Bay. However, over the last few years the 360o Flasher craze has really started to take hold in these fisheries. Small spinners or smaller Brad’s Kokanee Cut-Plugs have worked very well the last few years.

    Bottom fishing has been killer with lots of big rockfish being caught. Folks are taking advantage of how good the fishing is by heading out and catching their bottom fish limit quickly and then trolling for Salmon the rest of the day and usually catching that limit also. Vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs have been the go-to.

    Tuna fishing has remained stellar. Fishermen have been catching fish up and down the coast with boats catching fish on a multitude of techniques. Many have been trolling, vertical jigging, casting swimbaits, fishing live bait and even trolling large X-rap plugs.

    Trout fishing around the local area has been picking up, especially with the evening starting to cool down a little bit. The Trout can sense the onset of fall and are going to start trying to pack on the weight for a long winter. ODFW will continue to stock Trout throughout the fall. Typically, these plants will have some of the nicer Trophy Trout mixed in, which can make for an exciting time at the lake not knowing what you might hook. Trolling small plugs, spinners, wedding rings and even flies are all great options when chasing these fun fish. Casting spinners along the shoreline also works well.

    In Tillamook Bay, Nehalem Bay and in Astoria the crabbing has been great. The crab is starting to get bigger with quality crab being caught recently. Always remember to weigh down your pots to insure they don’t get swept out to the ocean on some of the larger upcoming tides.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 13, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/5

    This weeks theme has been “Coho”, “Coho”, “Coho”!  The lower Columbia has been flooded with Coho and all up and down the coast the Salmon fishing has been excellent! This weeks theme has been “Coho”, “Coho”, “Coho”! The lower Columbia has been flooded with Coho and all up and down the coast the Salmon fishing has been excellent!

    Coho fishing in Astoria has really taken off this past week. With the large incoming tides the Coho flooded into the river and made up most of the catch. There were mixed reports of what the fish were biting, from fresh Anchovies and Herring to spinners, Super Baits, hoochies and Brad’s Cut Plugs. These fish like to flood into the river suspended in the water column, riding the cold-water thermocline that happens when the cold ocean water floods in over the hot Columbia water. Fishermen have been trolling with both 360o flashers and triangle flashers and both have been working well. It’s a personal preference as to whether you like to fish divers or lead.

    Chinook fishing is set to close on Friday, September 6th, on the lower Columbia from Bonneville Dam down. However, it remains open from Bonneville Dam up and folks that are putting in the time are being pleasantly rewarded. The most popular technique is trolling 360o flashers and small 3.5 spinners or Super Baits and Cut Plugs. There are also plenty of fishermen that will focus their efforts at the mouths of cold-water tributaries that feed the Columbia. In these areas people tend to hover fish eggs and shrimp as well as troll 360o flashers.

    Bottom fishing has continued to be great for fishermen that prefer a flaky white fish over salmon. These fish have continued to pack on weight and there have been some monster Seabass caught recently. Vertical jigs, Shrimp flies and large curly tail grubs all have been catching quality fish.

    Tuna fishing has continued to be fantastic! Tuna are still relatively close to shore and a variety of techniques have been working. A lot of folks are starting their day trolling to find some fish. Once they find them, they will throw live bait, swimbaits, vertical jigs and even horizontally jigging spoons for these super aggressive fish. With the warm temperatures don’t forget to immediately ice down your Tuna. It is a must when catching these fish in such warm water.

    Tributary Coho fishing is still in the beginning stages of the year. These early fish are usually chrome, angry, fast moving and on a one-way mission to their respective hatcheries. Twitching jigs, spinners, spoons, plugs and even flies can all entice these delicious fish. Locally, Coho are starting to show in both the Sandy & Clackamas Rivers, and #4 Blue Fox Spinners have been the ticket.

    Kokanee fishing in the local lakes has quietly been great! Ocean and Astoria Salmon fishing takes most of the attention this time of year. However, Kokanee fishing can be phenomenal! The fish have put on weight over the summer and with the lack of fishing pressure, there are plenty of willing biters.  These fish have been deep in the water column but as soon as we see some cooler day time temperatures they will rise closer to the surface. Trolling has still been the most popular choice, but some folks have been jigging and on certain days are doing quite well!

    Fall Trout fishing can be excellent and provides great opportunity for those wanting to get the whole family out on the water for a day of fishing. Trolling is still a great option and is also one of the best ways to get everyone in the family involved. Bobber fishing bait first thing in the morning can be great, as well as fishing bait off the bottom throughout the heat of the day. Once again, North Fork Reservoir has been getting almost weekly plantings of legal Trout. Henry Hagg Lake also received a shot of trophy Trout this past week. Which, on top of the massive plants of fish that this lake has already received, can always keep you wondering how big of a fish your next bite may be. Mt. Hood’s Timothy and Trillium Lakes can also offer some great Trout fishing this time of the year. Go get ‘em, folks!

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 05, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/29

    Salmon fishing is in full swing through out the region and this is a great time of the year to get young anglers into their very first salmon.  Just like young angler Thomas did with his dad Jarrett on a recent trip. Salmon fishing is in full swing through out the region and this is a great time of the year to get young anglers into their very first salmon. Just like young angler Thomas did with his dad Jarrett on a recent trip.

     

    Astoria coho fishing is a rockin’ and a rollin’ and the fish are starting to make their way up the river.  These fish love to flood in from the ocean on large incoming tides.  Holding into these hard pushing tides with a diver, flasher and an anchovy, herring or spinner will be a great place to start.  This is when you see those off the hook bites you often hear about.  Once the fish have pushed in, head up above the Megler Bridge to find them as the fish will often stage above the bridge through high slack.  These fish like to suspend off of the bottom, so staggering your depths will definitely help you dial-in exactly where they are.

    Tributary coho fishing has already started in some local rivers, while others are still waiting for their first push of fish.  These early fish are usually highly aggressive and love to attack spinners, spoons, plugs and jigs.  Targeting the lowest stretches of the river will be your best choice.  Look for deeper, faster moving water to find the most aggressive fish.

    Chinook fishing had been amazing the last few days of the retention season in Astoria and continued to be amazing through the last few days of the retention season below Warrior Rock.  This means that the fishing above Warrior Rock should continue to be killer through the 8th of September.  The majority of fishermen are going to be trolling 360 flashers with either small 3.5 size spinners, Brad’s Super Baits or Cut Plugs and even large Spin-N-Glo.  Another great option is to target these fish on the outgoing tide while on anchor with a wobbler or spinner.  Targeting deeper water in the 35’-55’ depth will be your best option.

    Bottom fishing has continued to be great and some of the seabass have really started to pack on the pounds.  Shrimp flies and vertical jigs have both been producing really well as of late.

    Tuna fishing has been one of the best seasons in recent history.  Fish have been caught as close as 20 miles off shore and with warm water currents getting close to the west coast shoreline there have been quite a mix of warm water fish being caught. Yellow tail, blue fin tuna, black marlin and even Spanish Mackerel have been caught.  So, when your drag starts screaming, you really won’t know what you’ve hooked until you get a good look at it.  Albacore have been caught this past week vertical jigging iron, casting swimbaits, trolling clones, cedar plugs and large x-rap plugs.

    Walleye fishing throughout the Columbia River Gorge is a fishery that starts to get forgotten about this time of year as chinook seem to overshadow these delicious fish.  However, if you are looking to have a relaxing day slow trolling for tasty walleye, this time of year can be great with the lack of pressure.

    Trout fishing has also quietly continued to be a great option for those looking to get out on the water.  ODFW has continued to stock high mountain lakes and recently Harriet Lake and Trillium Lake both received over 2,000 fish.  A little closer to town, North Fork Reservoir just received almost 17,000 legal trout, and Estacada Lake received 2,000.  Early morning trolling is a great choice, as is fishing bait under bobbers near any cold water creeks that feed a lake.  Fish will tend to migrate towards those areas as the heat of the day warms up the lake.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 30, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/22

    Late summer/fall is a great time to be an angler in the awesome Pacific Northwest, as shown by the Steelhead Kid, who recently caught and released this gorgeous summer run from the Deschutes River. Nice steelhead, Judd! With great fishing ahead for salmon, bottom fish, tuna, trout, walleye, bass and more, it’s hard to decide which direction to point the truck or boat! Late summer/fall is a great time to be an angler in the awesome Pacific Northwest, as shown by the Steelhead Kid, who recently caught and released this gorgeous summer run from the Deschutes River. Nice steelhead, Judd! With great fishing ahead for salmon, bottom fish, tuna, trout, walleye, bass and more, it’s hard to decide which direction to point the truck or boat!

    Ocean Coho fishing remains excellent with most of the fish still staging just off of the mouth of the Columbia. These last few days we have seen a decent push of Coho in the river and any day now the major flood of Coho will happen. Then the Astoria Coho rodeo will be in full swing! These feisty fish usually come into the river in big numbers and like to flush in on big incoming tides. Trolling triangle flashers with spinners, Herring, Anchovies or Brad’s Cut Plugs are all great choices. You can also troll with 360° flashers and small spinners, however, the large incoming tides can make it difficult to use these flashers.

    Fall Chinook fishing just up river from Astoria has been getting better with every tide set. These fish love to move up river on outgoing tides so a lot of anglers will anchor fish with wobblers on outgoing tides. Once the tide turns and starts to come in, anglers have started to troll 360° flashers with small 3.5 spinners, Brad’s Cut Plugs or Super Baits.

    A few Coho have already started to enter local tributaries, but with this recent rain it will surely bring in the first few waves of Coho. These early fish love to eat spinners, plugs, jigs and bait. Targeting them in the lower stretches of the rivers will be your best option.

    Bottom fishing has continued to be good for anglers who are craving some fish tacos. These delicious fish have been plentiful with a good mix of Lingcod, Seabass and Cabezon. Vertical jigs, Rock Cod rigs, shrimp flies and curly tail grubs have all been producing.

    Tuna fishing has been rocking and rolling for the last few weeks and anglers have been finding great success all along the coast. A lot of anglers are choosing to troll to try and raise up a few biters, and then stopping the troll once they hook up. Once hooked up, other anglers on board can drop vertical jigs, swimbaits or use live bait and keep the fish near the boat.

    Walleye fishing throughout the Columbia and Willamette has still been good with some of the largest fish of the year being caught lately. Finding long, flat stretches of bottom is your best bet when looking for biters. Trolling worm harnesses with bottom walkers will also be your best bet when searching for fish.

    Trout fishing in the high mountain lakes has continued to be one of your best options when it comes to Trout fishing. However, locally ODFW has stocked North Fork Reservoir and Estacada Lake with a combined amount of over 10,000 Rainbow Trout. They will continue to plant Trout through the fall. Trolling small plugs or wedding rings are great options for chasing freshly planted Trout. Those that are fishing from the bank can find success casting spinners or bobber fishing worms.

    Kokanee fishing has also continued to be a great option. Kokanee are starting to really pack on the weight as we get closer to fall. These fish are still deep in the water column so using downriggers is a great option. Small Spin-n-Glo’s, small spinner blades and wiggle hoochies all will entice these delicious fish into biting. Troll them behind your favorite dodger and top your gear with some corn and you will be in business.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 23, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/15

    Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Tim Juarez, gives the thumbs up for a much-improved start to the salmon season over the past few years, and all those Coho haven’t even started to push into the river yet! Fish on! Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Tim Juarez, gives the thumbs up for a much-improved start to the salmon season over the past few years, and all those Coho haven’t even started to push into the river yet! Fish on!

    Ocean Coho fishing continues to be excellent as the Columbia is pushing 72 degrees, delaying the Coho from coming in early. These fish school up, making for fast and furious bite when you find them. Trolling triangle flashers and Herring or Anchovies with lead or a Delta Diver are the most popular choices. These fish are frantically feeding on any bait fish they can find, so bait is usually the way to go.

    Buoy 10/Astoria has been fishing better and better for Chinook on each tide set. These fish are on a one-way mission up river and with the Columbia being so warm they are wasting no time. Trolling with the outgoing tide and holding into the incoming tide has been the most widely used method. These fish have been biting both bait and spinners with bait being the most popular option. A reminder that Buoy 10 to Tongue point stretch of river will close to Chinook retention, next Wednesday August 21st. By that time there should be plenty of Coho entering the river to give anglers some incredible action and the ability to harvest two fin clipped Coho.

    Folks have started wobbler fishing and trolling spinners at the mouth of the Cowlitz and Lewis. These fisheries are usually tide dependent, however, with the popularity of the 360O Flasher you can catch these fish all day long. Most fishermen will anchor up on the outgoing and fish wobblers or spinners. Once the tide starts to slack up and into incoming, that’s when the 360O Flasher and small spinners come in. These fish will become suspended at this point and so staggering your depths to find where they are will be crucial. Brad’s Super Bait Cut Plugs, spinners and even Spin-N-Glo’s are all great options to run behind a 360O Flasher.

    Kokanee fishing has remained a constant option, especially for those that are wanting to eat some Salmon but not drive down to the coast. These land-locked Sockeye have really been packing on some weight these last few months so don’t be surprised if you catch some football shaped fish! Trolling your favorite dodger with a small Spin-N-Glo, spinner blades, hoochies and corn will all entice bites. The lakes and reservoirs have warmed up some, so don’t be surprised if you need to drop down deep to find the schools of waiting Kokanee.

    High mountain Trout fishing has also continued to be good. For those that are sneaking in another camping trip before the kids go back to school, mountain lakes can provide some great action this time of year. Trolling small plugs, spinners and flies are a great early morning choice. Following the morning, fish will head to the deeper sections of the lake during the heat of the day. Fishing bait off the bottom may be one of your best bets during this time. Then in the evening, fish will start to move back into the shallower water looking for an easy meal. Casting spinners, spoons and flies are all great evening options.

    Bottom fishing remains great along the coast, with fishermen finding success from the southern Oregon coast all the way up the Washington shoreline. Shrimp flies, large curly tail grubs, vertical jigs and P-Line Rock Cod Rigs are all great options.

    On the Tuna grounds, things have drastically changed compared to a few weeks ago. Warm water currents have moved in close to shore and fishermen are finding hard fighting Albacore as close as 20 miles off the mouth of the Columbia. There has also been a surprising amount of other warm water species being encountered this year. Yellowtail, Blue Fin Tuna, and Spanish Mackerel have all been caught this last week while targeting Albacore. You never know what you might encounter this year. Trolling, vertical jigging and live bait have all been taking fish.

    Walleye fishing continues to be good throughout the Columbia River Gorge with most fishermen still trolling bottom walkers and worm harnesses. Finding long, flat, even bottomed sections of river are where folks have been finding the best success.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 16, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/8

    Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Terry Mulkey, enjoys sharing his love of Northwest salmon fishing with the next generation of anglers. Here he passes the torch on to young Oskar earlier this week near Astoria. Great catch, guys! Mulkey’s Guide Service: 503-803-1896. Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Terry Mulkey, enjoys sharing his love of Northwest salmon fishing with the next generation of anglers. Here he passes the torch on to young Oskar earlier this week near Astoria. Great catch, guys! Mulkey’s Guide Service: 503-803-1896.

    The famed Buoy 10 fishery started down in Astoria last week and the fishing has been good. Not many Coho in the mix, yet, as they are still all staging out in the ocean just off the mouth of the Columbia. Fishermen have been catching their Chinook by trolling both triangle or 360° flashers with Herring, Anchovies, spinners or Brad’s Super Bait Cut Plugs. Both the incoming and outgoing tides have been fishing well. On the incoming, fish are more suspended and on the outgoing the fish tend to get pressed down close to the bottom. With nearly a million coho expected back to the Columbia this year, salmon fishing in Astoria should be excellent in the coming weeks!

    The ocean all along the Oregon and Washington Coasts has been fishing well for both Coho and Chinook. These fish are starting to stage off the mouths of their respected rivers. So, focusing your efforts in those areas will be a great place to start. Fishing Herring or Anchovies behind your favorite flasher has been the most popular technique lately.

    Bottom fishing continues to be good along the coast with plenty of action for those chasing Lingcod and Rockfish. Vertical jigs have been working very well, as have Shrimp Flies and large curly tail grubs.

    Walleye fishing has been good throughout the Columbia River Gorge with a lot of fishermen focusing their efforts on the east side of Bonneville. Trolling worm harnesses has been the most widely used technique, however, some folks are also catching fish trolling longer stick baits.

    Trout fishing, especially in the high mountain lakes, has still been good with anglers trying to focus their efforts on the early morning and late evening hours, especially when we are seeing some temperatures in or near 90 degrees. Trolling small plugs has been working well as well as trolling flies. Early in the morning you will typically see Trout rising at the surface and slow trolling wooly buggers or similar flies can entice a few biters.

    Kokanee fishing has been great in Southwest Washington. Fishermen have been finding success at Swift, Yale and Merwin Lakes while trolling dodgers with small Spin-N-Glo’s, spinner blade and wiggle hoochies.  As usual, tipping your bait with corn is a must for these delicious fish. And don’t be afraid to change up your approach with trying different scents, as that can really get a bite going.

     

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and two most widely used baits, information on the Fisherman's Community page.

     

    Aug 09, 2019 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report