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  • Outdoor Report 10/11

    Scrappy searun cutthroat are currently available on many coastal rivers and estuaries and will hit a variety of flies and lures, though it's hard to beat a good old Rooster Tail spinner in black, yellow or "coach dog." Many coastal rivers are open for trout angling through October 31st, but be sure to check the specific regulations for the water you intend to fish. Scrappy searun cutthroat are currently available on many coastal rivers and estuaries and will hit a variety of flies and lures, though it's hard to beat a good old Rooster Tail spinner in black, yellow or "coach dog." Many coastal rivers are open for trout angling through October 31st, but be sure to check the specific regulations for the water you intend to fish.

    Fall Chinook fishing on coastal bays and tidewater remains challenging, but there are some fish around and it takes dedication and perseverance to connect with them. That said, there have been some sporadic episodes of good fishing, so if you happen to be at the right place at the right time you could see some good action. Another bright spot: the fish being caught have been of very nice size so far this season. It’s not too late to see a good surge of fish on the coast, but most agree that it will take some Fall weather with a good shot of rain to make it happen. Also, there have been a lot of jacks around, which hopefully bodes well for next year’s run. Crabbing also remains very good at this time.

    Monday’s rain was just enough to add some color to local rivers and both the Sandy and Clackamas have coho scattered throughout. Casting spinners, plugs and twitching jigs will all take fish at times, but it’s hard to beat roe fished under a float when the fish are being difficult. In the deeper, slower holes that coho often frequent, casting and slowly retrieving a Wiggle Wart or Brad’s Wiggler can be extremely effective and is a relaxing way to fish. Plus, strikes on plugs can be vicious!

    Chum salmon will be showing up to Tillamook Bay any day now and will be available for catch-and-release fishing in the Miami and Kilchis Rivers until November 15th, after which point it is closed to targeting them. Chum can be extremely aggressive biters and are a great way to introduce kids to salmon fishing. Many southwest Washington streams also have good chum runs and they get more widespread the further north you travel. Chum will hit a variety of lures, but it’s hard to beat a pink or chartreuse jig fished under a float. Another killer lure for chum is the Steelhead Scampi from BnR Tackle fished on a ¼ oz. jig head under a float —chum just can’t seem to resist them! If the fish are being finicky as they sometimes are, try tipping your jig with a small chunk of prawn meat or sand shrimp as this will often make them snap. Chum are a tough, hardy species, perfect for catch-and-release as long as they are treated with respect and gently released to go about their business of making more chum salmon.

    For warmwater anglers, the next few weeks are sort of the last hoorah for bass, walleye and panfish angling before cooler water really slows the bite. Not that you can’t catch these species during the winter months, it just takes much more patience and effort to do so. But right now these species are still actively feeding in preparation for winter, so go get ‘em while you can!

    Trout fishing has been very good at a long list of rivers and lakes throughout our region as the fish sense the onset of winter and gorge to build their fat reserves. Timothy Lake has been producing some nice rainbows and brook trout for anglers fishing Powerbait, nightcrawlers, flies and lures. Trout fishing on the Deschutes has also been good recently, with the fish dining on a variety of subsurface flies and lures. Some of the biggest trout of the year are caught in Autumn, so take advantage of the recent good weather and get the kids out for one last trout trip before it starts raining for the next six months!

    Cooler water temps also have the sturgeon bite improving on the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, offering a solid option for some good catch-and-release fishing close to home for one of the coolest fish to swim in Pacific Northwest waters. Fish on!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 12, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 10/4

    Customer Seth Fisher with a beautiful Fall Chinook from an Oregon coast stream. Customer Seth Fisher with a beautiful Fall Chinook from an Oregon coast stream.

    Locally, the Clackamas River has coho staging at the confluence with the Willamette, and bank anglers are catching them by casting hardware like #4 Blue Fox Vibrax Spinners in blue, purple and chartreuse. Meanwhile, boat anglers are catching a few in the Willamette by trolling Wiggle Warts and Brad's Wigglers in a variety of colors, but pink or fluorescent red and orange are old standbys. Coho are also spread throughout the Clackamas itself, but are very skittish in the low, clear water, and fishing early or late in the day is a decided advantage. Spinners, eggs or twitching jigs will all work at times, but the key has been finding unpressured fish. There are also a few summer steelhead being caught in the Clack by those targeting coho, and some of them have been very fresh, high-quality new arrivals. The Sandy also has some coho available, and the forecasted rain should draw more fish into each system just as we reach the historical peak run timing.

    Albacore tuna fishing is still going strong and it's possible this fishery will continue through the end of October. Typically, tuna this time of year are fatter and more selective, so having multiple techniques on board can change an "ok" day into an amazing day. Tuna clones, X-raps and cedar plugs will all work when lining-out your trolling arsenal. Vertical jigs are a must-have for when you find a good school of tuna and jigging iron can help rack up the numbers in a hurry. Live bait is always a smart option to keep on board and swimbaits should also be brought for when the fish stay just out of reach of your live bait.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing can be phenomenal this time of year. With very little pressure, these prehistoric creatures are willing to bite. Find a good drop-off and you will be in business. Squid, herring, sand shrimp and anchovies are great bait options.

    Bottom fishing is still going well with a lot of nice size sea bass in the mix. Curly tail grubs, shrimp flies and vertical jigs are all good options when chasing these delicious fish. Success this time of year usually depends on ocean conditions, so keep a keen weather-eye out and if the ocean gets lumpy, fish for salmon in the bays instead.

    Crabbing has been great and lots of fishermen are getting their limits rather quickly. Shad, chicken and fish carcasses are the top producing baits. Having multiple pots will help you get your limits faster and keep everyone entertained picking and setting.

    Surf perch prefer an incoming tide and tend to school up, so if you’re making cast after cast with no bites, keep moving. Once you find them, try to stay on them and you will have consistent action. Sand shrimp and clam necks are surf perch favorites when it comes to real bait. For those wanting something artificial, the Gulp Sandworm is your best choice. They come in multiple colors so bring a couple options as you never know what flavor they will key in on.

    Fall Chinook fishing is spotty on coastal estuaries, but there has been some decent action at times, and some big fish have been caught recently from Tillamook Bay, Nehalem and Nestucca tidewater. Rain will help draw more fish into the bays and tidewater stretches of rivers, as we are nearing the time that these fish must push up river. Those having success right now are catching fish while trolling 360° Flashers and small spinners, triangle flashers with a green or blue label cut-plug herring, or just trolling a herring with no flasher. Again, keeping a few options on board will greatly increase your odds.

    Trout fishing can be awesome this time of year, especially in the higher mountain lakes. The trout are starting to feel the cooler nights and know that winter is on its way, so they are starting to stock up their fat deposits for cold weather times. Plunking Bait on the bottom is always a great option, however, trolling flies, Flatfish or small Rapalas will also entice these beautiful fish into biting. Good luck!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Oct 04, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/27

    Fresh coho headed for the smoker, just another great reason to live in the incredible Pacific Northwest! Fresh coho headed for the smoker, just another great reason to live in the incredible Pacific Northwest!

    Fall chinook fishing along the coast is starting to pick up as fresh fish are pulling into the bays and tidewater reaches of rivers. These fresh fall chinook are big and angry - they will test your gear and your patience - but they can also be some of the biggest chinook you will ever hook. It is possible to hook fish that exceed 40lbs. and because they are minutes from the salt, you must make sure your gear is in perfect shape. The salt can do a number on your tackle, so check your hooks to make sure they are sticky sharp; check your gear often to make sure it is weed free; and check your swivels, this can be important when hooking fish of this caliber. Spinners and herring are the two most popular choices when trolling these bays and estuaries. Spinner size ranges from the smaller 3.5 size all the way up to the large size 8 thumper blades. Having both options on board will increase your chances of catching fish, especially during the tough days when the fish aren’t cooperating like we all wish they would.

    Tributary fishing for coho in the metro area is steadily improving. These fish have an internal time clock that will have them pushing up the rivers regardless of the weather. They can be aggressive or not in the mood to bite at all; bringing multiple techniques with you can be what makes the difference on a tough day. Eggs and twitching jigs are the two most popular techniques, but spinners, spoons and flies will also entice bites. Once we do get a good shot of rain look for this fishery to be wide open. Casting and retrieving plugs like the Brad’s Wiggler or Storm Wiggle Wart is an often forgotten but deadly technique.

    The nice weather sticking around means tuna fishing has still been great. Those who have been chasing these delicious fish are having success trolling, jigging and fishing live bait. The tuna have been putting on some weight as the season progresses so make sure your gear is in perfect shape because these fish will test your tackle.

    Crabbing continues to be great up and down the coast. Lots of people are reporting that the crab are really full and this bodes well for the next couple months of crabbing.

    Catch and release sturgeon fishing can be very good this time of year as there are lots of nice size fish around.  Squid, herring, sand shrimp and anchovies are all great options when picking bait for your next sturgeon trip.

    As our rivers and lakes continue to cool, trout and walleye and bass fishing heats up as the fish feel the urgency to feed before the onset of winter. Autumn provides some of the very best action for these species that the awesome Pacific Northwest has to offer. Fish on!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

     

    Sep 27, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/20

    Sturgeon retention opens again Saturday! Sturgeon retention opens again Saturday!

    Sturgeon fishing on the Columbia River from the Moana powerlines up to Bonneville Dam will be open for retention this Saturday the 22nd. Last Saturday quite a few folks took part in this limited fishery and there were lots of keepers caught. Most of the anglers found success fishing in deep water. Sand shrimp, squid, herring and anchovies were all baits that caught keepers. A key to success is having a variety of baits on hand because the fish can favor one type of bait and then change their minds and favor a different type.  One more key to success is don’t be afraid to change your spot, if you fish for an hour with no success, move. These fish will usually let you know right away if they are willing to bite.

    The Tillamook and Nehalem Bay fisheries have been putting out fish, many of these early fish are being caught trolling herring. These fish can be big and mean so, at times, you may need to step up your baits from green to blue label herring. These fish love a large profile bait with a slow roll. Sometimes the weeds in the bay can be a huge nuisance therefore flashers are not always implemented, when the weeds are not bad adding a flasher to the setup can be beneficial.  Trolling spinners is another popular technique in these fisheries. Typically, people will troll larger size spinners ranging from 5-8. However, with 360° flashers people troll small 3.5 spinners behind them and do amazingly well.

    Crabbing has been getting better along the coast line. From now through December will be some of the best crabbing of the year. Don’t be afraid to drop your pots on your way out salmon fishing, a brace of crab can be a great addition to a fish box full of salmon.

    Anglers continue to do well bottom fishing along the coast line, lots of large bass and lingcod have been caught. vertical jigs and large curly tail grubs are the most popular choices when choosing baits to use. Bring along a few top water lures as well, occasionally you can get a pile of sea bass near the surface and catching them on a top water lure is great fun. The general marine fish daily bag limit has been increased back to 5 fish. https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/marine-zone

    Albacore fishing has been pretty good recently, lots of anglers are finding fish with a multitude of techniques. Tuna have been caught by trolling cedar plugs and tuna clones as well as chasing them with vertical jigs. After you stop throw out a handful of dead or live anchovies before you start vertical jigging. This can greatly increase your odds of getting that school of tuna under your boat and could change it from a one or two fish stop to a 20-fish stop.

    There are coho in both the Sandy and the Clackamas Rivers. Fresh pods of fish will continue moving into them daily, for the next 6 weeks. These fish typically are on a one-way mission to get to the hatchery which means they are usually on the move, especially in the lower stretches of the river. Spinners, spoons, plugs and twitching jigs are all great techniques to use when chasing moving fish. Once you have found some holding fish then eggs, fly’s jigs and spinners will all produce strikes.

    As still waters cool down, trout activity increases to some of the best action of the year. If there are any trout waters near your favorite hunting areas, be sure to take a rod with you. There are still a large number of lakes getting stocked through the fall all throughout the state https://myodfw.com/fishing/
    species/trout/stocking-schedule

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 20, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/13

    Autumn trout fishing is on tap now! Autumn trout fishing is on tap now!

    Salmon fishing along the coast line has been getting progressively better with both the Tillamook and Nehalem bay seeing an increase in fish moving through. Trolling herring or larger profile spinners have dominated in the past and still work well, however 360° flashers are becoming more popular as well as small spinners, Super Baits or Super Cut Plugs. Conditions vary from day to day so having all three options on board will allow you to mix things up. The Central coast opens for Coho September 14th and 15th from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. To see the regulations for this fishery, please follow this link: https://bit.ly/2Ng0Wlc

    With the recent rain on the coastline the tributary rivers to the bays will see an increase in fish pushing into them. Primary tactics would be Kwikfish, bobber and eggs or back bouncing eggs.

    Both the Clackamas and Sandy rivers have had pods of fresh Coho moving up them this week as well, they are eager to bite a well-placed spinner or twitching jig. Coho love to eat eggs, floating a well cured egg will be a great option as the Coho spread throughout the rivers over the next week.

    Bottom fishing remains great along the coast with lots of fishermen reporting success when targeting rock bass, the Lingcod fishing has stayed decent as well. These fish love to bite vertical jigs, large curly tail grubs and on some days when they are near the surface will even eat top water lures. Some anglers have been dropping their crab pots on their way out to bottom or Salmon fish and are reporting some nice size crab with some reaching nearly 8 inches across the back!

    With the rain and cooler temperatures trout fishing has also been picking up, fall is when we will see some of the largest trout for the year. These big fish have been laying low during the hot weather and finally feel comfortable enough to venture into the shallower water to chase some food, they love to bite flies, spinners, Kastmasters and small Flatfish or Mag Lips.

    Sturgeon fishing on the Columbia River from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam will be open for two days of retention, Saturday the 15th and Saturday the 22nd. For more information go to: https://bit.ly/2Ng0Wlc . These fish have not had a lot of pressure with people focusing on Salmon so finding some deep water and dropping your favorite sturgeon bait will make for a fun Saturday of fishing, especially with the ability to take home a fish. Herring, anchovies, sand shrimp and squid are all great baits to use this time of year.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 14, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 9/6

    Danielle from our Oregon City store with a gorgeous Chinook that she caught earlier this week fishing in the scenic Columbia River Gorge. Nice catch, Danielle! Danielle from our Oregon City store with a gorgeous Chinook that she caught earlier this week fishing in the scenic Columbia River Gorge. Nice catch, Danielle!

    Salmon fishing on the Columbia River is in full swing from Bonneville down, with wide open bites occurring this week in the Gorge, Davis Bar and many other locations. Pulling small spinners behind Pro Troll Flashers has been the technique of choice, with VIP, Simon, Hildebrandt, Oregon Tackle UV Spinners and Half-Fast Baby Back Spinners all taking their share of fish. In the heavier current near Bonneville, or lower down on an outgoing tide, anchor fishing wobblers, plugs and spinners is also effective. Coastal Bays are also seeing some Chinook at this time, though action has been spottier than on the Columbia. Fish are being caught at Nehalem tidewater, Tillamook Bay and Siletz Bay and tidewater. These coastal fisheries will only improve in the coming weeks.

    Coho have arrived at the Clackamas River and some have been caught this week at the confluence with the Willamette River at Clackamette Park. Casting spinners at first and last light is the name of the game here, though the fish could bite at any time if we have cloud cover or rainy weather. There have also been a few coho caught up the Clackamas, and we have heard rumors of coho in the Sandy, yet nothing confirmed. Last year the coho on the Clackamas were surprisingly good biters, so we are hoping for a repeat. Rain will certainly help jump start our tributary coho fisheries region-wide. Have you seen next week’s weather forecast? Nothing like well-timed rain showers to kick off the coho season! When the action gets going, casting spinners, plugs, or twitching jigs will take plenty of fish, and drift-fishing or bobber-fishing eggs will take them when nothing else seems to work. Have you seen the new Spro Twitching Jigs at our stores? These come in a ¾-ounce size, which is great for getting down in deeper holes with heavier current.

    Shorter days, cooler weather and the onset of the Fall season means that trout, bass and walleye will be on the snap again in order to fatten up for the long Pacific Northwest winter. Smallmouth bass fishing on both the Willamette and Columbia Rivers has been off the charts recently, with crankbaits, drop-shotted plastics and topwater all working well at times. Three of our guys from the Oregon City store fished the Willamette River above the falls last week and caught and released well over 100 bass between them on a variety of techniques. Smallmouth are pugnacious, hard-fighting fish, and these fisheries are vastly under-utilized by the fishing public. Stop by any of our stores for tips on how to target bass, and we’ll help you get going on this fun fishery!

    Fall is a great time to target trout as they begin to aggressively feed again, and autumn in the high country is awesome! Brook trout, rainbows and cutthroat are all available depending on where you go, but keep in mind that Mt. Hood’s Timothy Lake has all three and is a vastly underrated trout fishery. There are some very large brook trout and rainbows to be had in Timothy, and right now is the time to get them!

    Crabbing continues to improve as we approach what many consider the best time of year for succulent, delicious Dungeness. Now is a good time to round up the crab pots and kids, and make one more crabbing adventure to the coast while we still have gorgeous late summer/fall weather. While you’re at the coast, keep in mind that bottom fishing is still excellent and salmon are also available off shore and are starting to show in the bays. Good luck!

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Sep 07, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/30

    What a great time of year to be an angler in the Pacific Northwest! Fall salmon are just beginning their migration; trout, bass and walleye are starting to feed more as water temperatures begin to cool; and even Tiger Musky begin to snap as they try to put on fat for the long winter ahead! What a great time of year to be an angler in the Pacific Northwest! Fall salmon are just beginning their migration; trout, bass and walleye are starting to feed more as water temperatures begin to cool; and even Tiger Musky begin to snap as they try to put on fat for the long winter ahead!

    Fishing in the Astoria area has been improving for fishermen targeting Coho.  These aggressive fish are typically found higher in the water column riding the temperature difference between the cool ocean and warm Columbia water, as opposed to Chinook who like to hug the bottom on outgoing tides.  Anchovies or herring will work when angling for Coho, and spinners are another good option.  The first few fish you encounter in a decent size pod will attack a well-placed spinner with reckless abandon.  Fishermen will use spinners ranging in size from 3.5 to 7, having a variety on hand can pay dividends.

    Chinook fishermen are starting to see better fishing along the lower Columbia all the way up to Bonneville.  These fish are on the move, so making sure you get your gear in front of these fish will be paramount.  Trolling spinners or anchor fishing wobblers will be the most popular choices for the lower river anglers.  As you get closer to Bonneville you will see many fishermen switching over to anchoring with Kwikfish.  The fish are in hard currents, so plugs are a terrific way to target these Chinook.  Wrapping your plugs with herring, sardines, anchovies or tuna will greatly improve your success.

    Anglers have had good success with catch and release sturgeon this last week using herring, anchovies, squid or sand shrimp as bait.  Having several different baits on board will allow you to key in what these fish want on a particular day.

    Bottom fishing has still been excellent for those targeting the saltwater species.  SeaBass, Lingcod and even near-shore Halibut have been making up most of the fish being caught.

    Crabbing has also been good lately.  The crab are starting to fill out and put on some weight, it looks like those crabbing this fall will be in for some quality sea spiders.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 30, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/23

    Fisherman’s Tackle Buyer, B.G. Eilertson, with an awesome bright Chinook he caught Wednesday near Astoria. Fisherman’s Tackle Buyer, B.G. Eilertson, with an awesome bright Chinook he caught Wednesday near Astoria.

    Here they come!  Along with some very nice Chinook being caught this past week, an increasing number of Silvers began moving into the Astoria area over the past several days with a hot bite above the Meglar Bridge.  Although the Buoy 10 area closes for Chinook retention after Friday, the opportunity and bag limit increased for fin clipped Coho. https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/columbia-zone.   The fleet has been split between fishing bait or spinners.  With warmer water certain tides have made the spinner bite go off.  For bait fishermen, both anchovies and herring have been successful.  Having a few flats of frozen herring on board can pay off as they will stay on your hook better than fresh when the tides get moving quickly.

    Once you start heading upriver away from the estuary it turns into more of a hardware fishery.  For those anchored up it’s mainly a spinners or wobbler program.  Anchored fishermen will tend to fish the deeper water and the outgoing tide.  When the tide is outgoing it will push the chinook to the bottom of the water column so it’s much easier to target them with spinners and wobblers.  For anglers that want to troll, either triangle or 360 Flashers in combination with small spinners, Brad’s Super Baits or Brad’s Cut Plugs will be your best bet.  This technique works best trolling the slack or incoming tides.  The fish will suspend up off the bottom and you can troll at a slower speed than when the tide is rolling out.

    Along the Northern Oregon coast, Nehalem and Tillamook Bays will be the next best bet for those that are wanting to scratch the salt water itch.  These bays will start to have fish entering them now through the end of November.  This allows plenty of opportunity for those that are looking forward to fishing for the months to come.  While dominated by herring and spinner fishermen, some anglers are implementing both triangle and 360 Flashers.

    Trout fishing is still an option this time of year, especially in the high mountain lakes.  When the weather is as hot as it’s been lately, focus on early mornings and late evenings with some shallow water trolling or find the cold-water inlet to the lake and focus there.  Fish will congregate in these areas trying to get a reprieve from the heat.  For anglers wanting to brave the heat of the day, night crawlers, single salmon eggs, Powerbait or Berkley Gulp products will produce bites.

    We’ve also received some recent reports of some great surf perch fishing along the coast.  Gulp sandworms or sand shrimp have been the top baits.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 24, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/16

    Kendra from our Oregon City store teamed up with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Jerry Toman, on August 16th to make this nice catch of Chinook near Astoria! Kendra from our Oregon City store teamed up with Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Jerry Toman, on August 16th to make this nice catch of Chinook near Astoria!

    Salmon fishing in Astoria is heating up!  There seem to be more chinook on every tide set, so things should blow wide open here any day.  Those that have been fishing out closer to the actual Buoy 10 have been getting a few coho, so when the fishery changes to a coho only fishery on the 24th, there will definitely be some around.  For the chinook fishermen, most folks are trolling either herring or anchovies in combination with a triangle flasher.  Some people are using 360 Flashers when the tide slows down at either low or high slack, as these fish will typically suspend up off of the bottom so these flashers definitely work well during that time period.

    As the month progresses the fish move up river and the wobbler fishermen will start to chip away at the packs of fresh chinook moving upstream.  These fish move the hardest on an outgoing tide and will get pushed flat to the bottom from the pressure of the current.  Finding under water seams or long flat sections of 35’-55’ feet of water will be your best bet at intercepting these fish.  Once the tide slacks up then you can definitely start trolling for them with either triangle or 360 Flashers and small spinners or Brad's Super Bait Cut Plugs®.

    The summer steelhead fishing continues to be good in the Columbia.  A lot of fishermen have transferred over to targeting chinook, but that just means the steelhead that are still coming up river are seeing very few steelhead type baits.  Fishing coon stripe shrimp continues to be the most popular bait with small spinners and plugs being the second and third options.  There are also the cold water fisheries that become popular up in the Gorge this time of year.  Herman Creek and Drano Lake are popular because of the cold water influences that these summer steelhead love to hang out in.  These are primarily bobber fisheries with coon stripe shrimp and jigs being the two popular options.

    Bottom fishing continues to be great out in the ocean.  For those that still want to scratch that itch, bottom fishing is a fun and easy way to fill the fish box for fish tacos or fish and chips.  Shrimp flies, vertical jigs or large curly tail grubs have all been productive lately.

    Crabbing is getting better and better with the crabs definitely starting to fill out more.  We have had reports of large keepers being taken up and down the coast.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

    Aug 16, 2018 | by FMO STAFF, Weekly FMO report
  • Outdoor Report 8/9

    Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, with a nice Chinook caught a couple of days ago near Astoria, Oregon. Salmon fishing is off to a great start at Buoy Ten, and should only get better in the coming days. Fish on! (Northwest Angling Experience and Chris V: 503-349-1377.) Fisherman’s Pro Guide, Chris Vertopoulos, with a nice Chinook caught a couple of days ago near Astoria, Oregon. Salmon fishing is off to a great start at Buoy Ten, and should only get better in the coming days. Fish on! (Northwest Angling Experience and Chris V: 503-349-1377.)

    Astoria is already fishing well with most of the catch being nice chinook.  Not a lot of coho have been in the catch yet as they are still staging just off the mouth, waiting to come inside.  The chinook fishing in the river has been good with many anglers using either bait or spinners.  The bait guys have been divided with half the fleet using anchovies and half the fleet using herring. Most anglers choose to brine their herring to try and separate their bait from everyone else’s. Fisherman’s Marine has lots of options for brining herring, just swing by and pick your poison, the tackle staff will be happy to help.  The spinner fleet has also been divided with half the fleet using smaller 3.5 size spinners and the other half using larger size 6-6.5 size spinners.  Both sizes have been working, so it’s just a matter of what you have more confidence in.  The amount of fish in the estuary keeps building every tide set, so the fishing will continue to get better and better every day.

    Locally the steelhead fishing on the Columbia has been very consistent with people having good success from the Cathlamet all the way to Bonneville.  Most anglers are fishing coon stripe shrimp paired with a Spin-n-Glo for added attraction.  These fish are typically great biters, so it turns into a game of finding where the fish are running and getting your gear in their way. Small Flatfish, K11 Kwikfish, Wiggle Warts or Mag Lips are all great options for these chrome-bright summer steelhead.

    Ocean fishing has been great for those chasing salmon.  In the Astoria area and along the coastline, the coho fishing has been killer with lots of nice solid fish in the mix and chinook being caught as well.  There are some anglers that are catching their coho limits so fast that they will target also bottom fish, usually lingcod or seabass. Large Curly Tail Grubs and shrimp flies will be the most popular seabass tackle, and large Curly Tail Grubs and large jigs are what most folks are using to target lingcod.

    NOTE:  DUE TO THE HOT COHO BITE IN THE OCEAN, THE QUOTA IS EXPECTED TO BE REACHED, AND THE OCEAN OFF THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA, WILL CLOSE SUNDAY EVENING FOR COHO AND CHINOOK.
    For more info:  https://www.dfw.state.or.us/mrp
    /salmon/updatesnew.asp

    Trout fishing has also remained steady with an abundance of stocked fish available.  Lake fishing for trout is a fun way to spend a weekend with the family.  Troll around some Wedding Rings or small Flatfish and you will be able to have consistent action to keep the kids busy.

    Always be sure to check local regulations at ODFW and WDFW before heading out. Find reports and information on the Fisherman's Community page.

     

    Aug 10, 2018 | by FMO STAFF